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"Mr President, once again, we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@en4
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lpv:translated text
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@cs1
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@da2
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@de9
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@el10
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@es21
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@et5
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@fi7
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@fr8
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@hu11
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@it12
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@lt14
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@lv13
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@mt15
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@nl3
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@pl16
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@pt17
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@ro18
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@sk19
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@sl20
"Mr President, once again we are trying to spend our way out of trouble. Excessive consumption without any commensurate production is why we are in this mess, and more subsidies are the problem rather than the solution. I know it is a very unpopular thing to say this in this Chamber, where you get thunderously applauded if you make any kind of attack on the British Conservatives – as we saw yesterday, when Mr Swoboda did it, and the day before, when Mr Barroso did it. I think the mood of the House can perhaps be best understood in psychological terms. Perhaps I should ask my friend and colleague, Charles Tannock, who is a proper psychiatrist, to explain it in terms of transference, in terms of projection. The thing is that nobody is enjoying this mess, for all that Mr Barroso claims otherwise. No one could possibly be enjoying the economic crisis that is engulfing Europe, and nobody likes to say ‘I told you so’; it never makes you popular. What we are pleading for is that the people who have got the analysis right so far be listened to next time, so that we stop repeating the very mistake that led us to our present discontent. We are where we are because we have been spending too much and borrowing too much. We are not going to get out of it by spending more and borrowing more."@sv22
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