Local view for "http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/eu/plenary/2012-05-09-Speech-3-210-000"

PredicateValue (sorted: default)
rdf:type
dcterms:Date
dcterms:Is Part Of
dcterms:Language
lpv:document identification number
"en.20120509.21.3-210-000"6
lpv:hasSubsequent
lpv:speaker
lpv:spoken text
"Mr President, in recent years, there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case-law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@en4
lpv:spokenAs
lpv:translated text
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@cs1
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@da2
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@de9
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@el10
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@es21
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@et5
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@fi7
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@fr8
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@it12
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@lv13
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@mt15
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@nl3
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@pt17
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@ro18
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@sk19
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@sl20
"Mr President, in recent years there has been a growth in the number of applications to the European Patent Office for patents on plants and animals derived from conventional breeding. Without doubt, the most difficult determinations involved when creating a potential trail of case law for patenting essentially biological processes is where to draw the line between a method rendered entirely in a laboratory and the extent to which natural viable processes will then be governed by law. Producers, universities and enthusiastic gardeners and breeders must not be vulnerable to multinational industrial giants who are monopolising designs for naturally-rendered new species. The EU’s 1998 directive does not clearly define the boundaries between classical and modern methods of breeding and does not consider the social, economic or ecological implications. Cultural discrepancies and the social and moral implications of genetic modification and manipulation and the propagation of new life forms for scientific investigation or commercial or agricultural purposes must be heeded and should remain the sovereign prerogative of nation states."@sv22
lpv:unclassifiedMetadata
"John Bufton (EFD ). -"18,5,20,15,1,19,14,16,11,2,22,7,3,10,13,9,21,12,17,8
lpv:videoURI

Named graphs describing this resource:

1http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Czech.ttl.gz
2http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Danish.ttl.gz
3http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Dutch.ttl.gz
4http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/English.ttl.gz
5http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Estonian.ttl.gz
6http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Events_and_structure.ttl.gz
7http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Finnish.ttl.gz
8http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/French.ttl.gz
9http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/German.ttl.gz
10http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Greek.ttl.gz
11http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Hungarian.ttl.gz
12http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Italian.ttl.gz
13http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Latvian.ttl.gz
14http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Lithuanian.ttl.gz
15http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Maltese.ttl.gz
16http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Polish.ttl.gz
17http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Portuguese.ttl.gz
18http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Romanian.ttl.gz
19http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Slovak.ttl.gz
20http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Slovenian.ttl.gz
21http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Spanish.ttl.gz
22http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Swedish.ttl.gz
23http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/spokenAs.ttl.gz

The resource appears as object in 2 triples

Context graph