Local view for "http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/eu/plenary/2012-05-09-Speech-3-142-000"

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"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@cs1
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@da2
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@de9
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@el10
"Mr President, as you know, I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March, we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and, in the meantime, we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far, the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and, more generally, to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and, in particular, with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@en4
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@es21
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@et5
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@fi7
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@fr8
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@hu11
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@it12
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@lt14
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@lv13
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@mt15
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@nl3
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@pl16
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@pt17
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@ro18
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@sk19
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@sl20
"Mr President, as you know I am replacing Mrs Kroes in this debate. First a word on the steps that the Commission has taken regarding relations with Tunisia and Libya. The EU is making progress towards developing its own cooperation with Tunisia and Libya. The EU launched a dialogue with Tunisia on migration, mobility and security in October last year. On 25 March we held the second round of this dialogue and started negotiating the contents of an EU-Tunisia mobility partnership which we hope to be able to agree on before the summer break. We are ready to start a similar dialogue with Libya as soon as conditions allow it and in the meantime we are providing the Libyan authorities with technical assistance. The EU is ready to provide support for the identification and assistance of persons in need of international protection in Libya, but so far the Libyan authorities are reluctant to cooperate with the UNCHR and more generally to recognise refugees’ rights. A word, maybe, on the implications of the Hirsi case. It is essential that cooperation with third countries is carried out in full respect of EU and international obligations and in particular with the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, Hirsi Jamaa and others versus Italy, which raises EU and international law questions. When carrying out border control activities, Member States must respect fundamental rights and must refrain from taking any measures in violation of the principle of non-refoulement. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure that EU rules and international obliterations are respected and to help avoid humanitarian catastrophes. We will continue to provide financial support. Expertise in dealing with large flows of immigrants is also available via Frontex and EASO. I will, of course, pass on all of your remarks to the competent Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström."@sv22
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6http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Events_and_structure.ttl.gz
7http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Finnish.ttl.gz
8http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/French.ttl.gz
9http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/German.ttl.gz
10http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Greek.ttl.gz
11http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Hungarian.ttl.gz
12http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Italian.ttl.gz
13http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Latvian.ttl.gz
14http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Lithuanian.ttl.gz
15http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Maltese.ttl.gz
16http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Polish.ttl.gz
17http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Portuguese.ttl.gz
18http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Romanian.ttl.gz
19http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Slovak.ttl.gz
20http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Slovenian.ttl.gz
21http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Spanish.ttl.gz
22http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/rdf/Swedish.ttl.gz

The resource appears as object in 2 triples

Context graph