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"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan; it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago, the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multinational state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@en4
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"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@cs1
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@da2
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@de9
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@el10
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@es21
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@et5
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@fi7
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@fr8
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@hu11
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@it12
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@lt14
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@lv13
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@mt15
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@nl3
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@pl16
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@pt17
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@ro18
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@sk19
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@sl20
"Madam President, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is sometimes spoken of as a frozen war, but I am not sure that is the right metaphor. It implies a stability that is not there. It would be better to think of it as some kind of infection under the skin that festers and poisons the surrounding region. It does not just prejudice relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan, it is also prejudicing relations between Armenia and Turkey – indeed also with Iran, with Russia and not least with the European Union. It is extraordinary that so many years have passed without this issue being resolved. It is not for want of trying. Virtually every international organisation has tried to mediate some sort of settlement. I just wonder whether the reason that we have not been able to reach an equitable and lasting peace is because the international mediation, run as it is by international diplomats, is based around the idea of multinational states and existing territorial borders. A while ago the former President of Armenia, Mr Ter-Petrosyan, said that if there has been a ceding of some of the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, there might have been peace in 1997. 800 000 Azeris and 400 000 Armenians have been displaced. Surely it is time to look at some alternative to the multi-national state, with some territorial readjustment if that is the way to bring lasting peace."@sv22
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