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"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But, of course, what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining, I will, of course, support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@en4
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"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@cs1
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@da2
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@de9
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@el10
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@es21
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@et5
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@fi7
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@fr8
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@hu11
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@it12
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@lt14
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@lv13
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@mt15
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@nl3
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@pl16
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@pt17
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@ro18
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@sk19
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@sl20
"Madam President, the Serbs will never be able to complain, as my constituents in the United Kingdom do, that the implications for national sovereignty were not clear when the European Union offered them membership, and I say the implications for national sovereignty in the fullest sense. When Ratko Mladić was arrested and handed over, President Sarkozy made a statement on behalf of the European Union saying that Serbia had thereby proved its fitness to join. If you stop and think about it, the opposite really should be true: a country would have proved its democratic and liberal fitness when such a man could get justice in Belgrade or could be fairly extradited to Bosnia. But of course what we are doing is stepping in and saying, ‘we do not allow you even your internal domestic legal system’, something that has not happened in Serbia since the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum of 1914. That, of course, was the point that was rejected. We have to be fair in how we apply the rules to all of the applicant states. If Serbs vote in favour of joining I will of course support them, but they should be in no doubt as to what the implications for their democracy are."@sv22
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