Local view for "http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/eu/plenary/2006-10-24-Speech-2-032"

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"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@en4
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"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@cs1
"Fru formand! Jeg vil gerne takke Parlamentet for at have organiseret denne forhandling om brystkræft. De mange detaljer i spørgsmålene viser, hvor mange problemer der er involveret. Jeg vil ikke forsøge at tage fat på hvert spørgsmål for sig. Det ville være en umulig opgave i betragtning af min begrænsede taletid. Men jeg vil være meget glad for at give detaljerede oplysninger senere. Naturligvis må vi indrømme, at de fleste af disse aktioner hovedsagelig er beregnet for medlemsstaterne, men EU kan og vil give støtte - som når det drejer sig om forskning - hvor det er muligt. Som et bevis herpå kan jeg henvise til kommende støtte til retningslinjer for screening for brystkræft, der vil fortsætte under det nuværende og de kommende sundhedsprogrammer, Det Europæiske Råds netværk og EU-netværket for information om kræft i Europa. Et nyt projekt, som nu står højt oppe på listen, besvarer nogle af spørgsmålene vedrørende udstrækningen af retningslinjerne. EU-retningslinjerne vil blive opdateret for ikke blot at dække fastsættelsen af normer for sygeplejersker med speciale i brystkræft, men også specifikationerne for specialiserede brystcentre. De vil sætte normerne, principperne og benchmarks, som medlemsstaterne må tilpasse deres brystkræftscreening, uddannelse og behandling til. Disse initiativer vil dække behovet for oplysninger og konsultationer i de nye medlemsstater såvel som hjælpe med at integrere de relevante eksperter i de eksisterende netværk. Vi må aldrig glemme, at der hvert år er mere end en kvart million kvinder, der er afhængige af sådanne initiativer. De og deres familier er afhængige af, hvor højt vi og medlemsstaterne prioriterer et så vigtigt og alvorligt problem. Vi må ikke svigte dem. Jeg vil derfor fokusere på tre nøgleområder, men først vil jeg gerne erkende omfanget af problemet, som mange talere allerede har nævnt. Hvert år får 270.000 kvinder i EU en brystkræftdiagnose. Det påvirker deres og deres families liv, og det har meget betydelige medicinske, sociale og økonomiske omkostninger. Det første spørgsmål, jeg gerne vil tage fat på - og det er allerede sket - er, hvor langt vi er kommet siden Parlamentets beslutning af 5. juni 2003. Det er sandt, at denne beslutning formulerede nogle ambitiøse mål, som medlemsstaterne skulle nå inden 2008, i særdeleshed et fald på 25 % i dødeligheden og en reduktion af forskellen mellem overlevelsesraterne for brystkræft i de forskellige medlemsstater til 5 %. Jeg må erkende, at det er for tidligt til, at vi nøjagtig kan vide, hvor store fremskridt der er sket. Medlemsstaterne har forpligtet sig til at rapportere til Kommissionen ved udgangen af dette år, tre år efter vedtagelsen af henstillingerne fra Rådet. Kommissionen vil derfor fremlægge en gennemførelsesrapport i 2007. Jeg kan forsikre Dem for, at manglen på oplysninger fra nogle medlemsstater ikke vil forsinke fremkomsten af denne rapport. I stedet vil den udpege de medlemsstater, der ikke har givet oplysninger. Der er allerede tegn på, at beslutningen og andre aktioner har haft positive virkninger og er begyndt at gøre en forskel. Vi forventer fremskridt omkring aspekter som udveksling af modeller for bedste praksis til at lette anvendelsen i forskellige dele af EU og retningslinjer for diagnose ved screening, som giver en meget væsentlig reduktion i dødeligheden ved brystkræft. Ud over at give resultater, hvad angår dødelighed, håber vi at have data til at kunne tegne et klart billede af de tidsrammer, der er involveret, og af udviklingen med hensyn til uligheder. Det andet generelle område, jeg gerne vil berøre, er forskning. Brystkræft vil indtage en stærk rolle under det syvende rammeprogram. Det vil dække både påvisningen af sygdommen og, hvad der er afgørende, årsagerne - med andre ord, hvordan den kan forhindres. Hvad angår påvisning, fokuserer forskningen især på at forbedre screening for brystkræft og alternativer til konventionel mammografi for at forbedre tidlig påvisning af sygdommen. Eksempler, der allerede støttes under det sjette rammeprogram, indbefatter bl.a. mammografi med molekylær billedteknik eller anvendelse af positronemissionstomografi - PET - som er særlig beregnet til undersøgelse for brystkræft. Tidlig påvisning er naturligvis afgørende for at sikre en succesrig behandling, men det er stadig sygdommen snarere end årsagerne til den, der behandles. Jeg er derfor meget glad for, at arbejdet med årsagerne til kræft prioriteres højt i forskningsrammeprogrammet. Det arbejde vil dække de tre centrale områder genetik, miljø og livsstil. For det tredje er der spørgsmålet om kampagner. De kan spille en meget vigtig rolle for problemer vedrørende folkesundheden ved at skærpe opmærksomheden på afgørende problemer hos enkeltindivider, offentlige myndigheder og beslutningstagere såvel som hos ansatte ved sundhedsvæsenet naturligvis. Ikke alene sætter det enkeltindivider i stand til at hjælpe og beskytte sig selv, det lægger også pres på beslutningstagerne for at få dette problem prioriteret, hvilket de undertiden undlader at gøre. Parlamentets beslutning fra 2003 har været en effektiv del af en igangværende kampagne for at forøge opmærksomheden. Forøgelse af opmærksomheden blandt kvinder for betydningen af screening har været en afgørende del af EU-aktionen mod kræft. Sådanne kampagner kan støttes under vores offentlige sundhedsprogram. Afslutningsvis er vi alle enige om, at brystkræft må håndteres, og at eksempler på bedste praksis viser, at der kan nås bemærkelsesværdige resultater. Men vi må forstå, at det er en fortløbende proces. Vi må aldrig blive tilfredse, selv om vi bliver opmuntret af en succes i begyndelsen for nogle af disse bestræbelser og initiativer. Der er behov for en sammenhængende og fælles tilgang, der i særdeleshed dækker de tre aspekter, jeg tidligere har fremhævet."@da2
". Frau Präsidentin! Ich danke dem Parlament dafür, dass es diese Aussprache zu Brustkrebs angesetzt hat. Die Detailliertheit der Anfragen zeigt ja die Breite der Aspekte, um die es hier geht. Ich werde nicht versuchen, auf jede Anfrage gesondert einzugehen; das wäre ein aussichtsloses Unterfangen angesichts meiner begrenzten Redezeit. Allerdings wäre ich sehr gern bereit, genauere Informationen zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt zu geben. Zugegebenermaßen sind natürlich die meisten dieser Maßnahmen vor allem für die Mitgliedstaaten, aber die Europäische Union kann und wird Hilfestellung geben, etwa im Falle der Forschung, wo immer es ihr möglich ist. Als Anhaltspunkt verweise ich auf die künftige Unterstützung für die Leitlinien für das Brustkrebs-Screening, die im Rahmen der laufenden und künftigen Gesundheitsprogramme, des Netzes des Europäischen Rates und des Netzes der Europäischen Union für Krebsinformationen in Europa weiterlaufen wird. Ein neues Vorhaben, das jetzt in die engere Wahl gekommen ist, liefert Antworten auf einige Fragen zur Erweiterung der Leitlinien. Die Leitlinien der Europäischen Union werden dahin gehend aktualisiert, dass sie nicht nur die Festlegung von Standards für Brustkrebskrankenschwestern, sondern auch die Spezifikation für spezielle Brustzentren betreffen. Sie werden die Standards, Prinzipien und Eckdaten vorgeben, nach denen die Mitgliedstaaten dann das Brustkrebs-Screening, die Brustkrebsausbildung und die Brustkrebsbehandlung auslegen müssen. Diese Initiativen werden auch dem in den neuen Mitgliedstaaten vorhandenen Informations- und Beratungsbedarf gerecht und sollen mithelfen, die entsprechenden Fachleute in die bestehenden Netze zu integrieren. Wir dürfen nie vergessen, dass jedes Jahr mehr als eine Viertelmillion Frauen von solchen Maßnahmen abhängig sind. Sie und ihre Familien sind davon abhängig, dass wir und die Mitgliedstaaten einem so wichtigen und ernsten Problem Priorität geben. Wir dürfen sie nicht im Stich lassen. Ich werde mich deshalb auf drei zentrale Bereiche konzentrieren, doch zuerst möchte ich die Größenordnung der Problematik bestätigen, die ja bereits von vielen Rednern erwähnt wurde. Alljährlich wird bei 270 000 Frauen in der Europäischen Union Brustkrebs diagnostiziert. Das belastet ihr Leben und das Leben ihrer Familien, und es ist mit erheblichen medizinischen, sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Kosten verbunden. Der erste Punkt, zu dem ich etwas sagen möchte – und er kam bereits zu Sprache –, ist, wie weit wir seit der Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments vom 5. Juni 2003 gekommen sind. Es stimmt, dass in der Entschließung einige ehrgeizige Ziele gesetzt wurden, die die Mitgliedstaaten bis 2008 erreichen sollen, namentlich die Reduzierung der Mortalitätsrate um 25 % und eine Reduzierung der bestehenden Unterschiede zwischen den Mitgliedstaaten bei den Überlebenschancen auf 5 %. Zugegebenermaßen ist es zu früh, um genau zu wissen, wie weit man vorangekommen ist. Die Mitgliedstaaten haben sich verpflichtet, der Kommission über die Lage bis Ende dieses Jahres Bericht zu erstatten, also drei Jahre nach Annahme der Ratsempfehlungen. Die Kommission wird darum 2007 einen Fortschrittsbericht erstellen. Ich kann Ihnen versichern, dass fehlende Informationen aus einigen Mitgliedstaaten die Erarbeitung des Berichts nicht verzögern werden. Vielmehr werden im Bericht die Mitgliedstaaten aufgeführt sein, die die Informationen nicht übermittelt haben. Es gibt bereits Anzeichen dafür, dass die Entschließung und andere Maßnahmen positive Wirkung zeigen und zu greifen beginnen. Wir rechnen mit Fortschritten in Bereichen wie dem Austausch bewährter Praxismodelle, um die Anwendung in verschiedenen Teilen der EU zu erleichtern, was zu einigen ganz deutlichen Reduzierungen bei der Brustkrebs-Mortalität geführt hat. Zusätzlich zur Vorlage der Ergebnisse bei der Mortalität werden wir hoffentlich auch über Daten verfügen, die uns ein klares Bild vom jeweiligen Zeitrahmen und den Entwicklungen bei den Unterschieden vermitteln. Der zweite allgemeine Bereich, auf den ich kurz eingehen möchte, ist die Forschung. Brustkrebs wird eine große Rolle im Rahmen des Siebten Rahmenprogramms spielen. Dabei wird es sowohl um die Erkennung der Krankheit als auch und vor allem um die Ursachen gehen, also wie man ihr vorbeugen kann. Im Zusammenhang mit der Erkennung konzentriert sich die Forschung vorrangig auf die Verbesserung des Brustkrebs-Screenings und Alternativen zur konventionellen Mammographie, um die Früherkennung zu verbessern. Beispiele, die bereits mit dem Sechsten Rahmenprogramm gefördert wurden, sind die Mammographie mit molekularer Bildgebung oder die Anwendung der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) speziell ausgelegt für die Brustkrebsuntersuchung. Die Früherkennung ist natürlich entscheidend für eine erfolgreiche Behandlung, aber es handelt sich immer noch um eine Behandlung der Krankheit und nicht der Ursachen. Deshalb bin ich sehr froh, dass die Arbeit zu den Ursachen von Krebs eine Priorität im Forschungsrahmenprogramm ist. Diese Arbeit wird die drei Schlüsselbereiche genetische Faktoren, Umwelt und Lebensstil umfassen. Drittens der Aspekt der Kampagnen: Diese können eine sehr wichtige Rolle in Bereichen der Volksgesundheit spielen, um das Bewusstsein der Menschen, der öffentlichen Behörden und von Entscheidungsträgern sowie natürlich auch des medizinischen Personals für wesentliche Fragen zu schärfen. Sie versetzen nicht nur die Menschen in die Lage, sich selbst zu helfen und zu schützen, sondern setzen auch die Entscheidungsträger unter Druck, diesem Problem Vorrang zu geben, was ja nicht immer der Fall ist. Die Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments von 2003 ist ein wirksamer Bestandteil einer laufenden Sensibilisierungskampagne. Die Sensibilisierung von Frauen für die Bedeutung des Screenings ist ein maßgeblicher Teil der europäischen Maßnahmen gegen Krebs. Solche Kampagnen können im Rahmen unseres Programms im Bereich der öffentlichen Gesundheit gefördert werden. Schließlich und endlich sind wir uns alle einig, dass Brustkrebs auf der Tagesordnung stehen muss, und Beispiele für nachahmenswerte Praktiken zeigen ja, dass spürbare Ergebnisse erreicht werden können. Aber wir müssen verstehen, dass dies ein ständiger Prozess ist. Wir dürfen niemals selbstzufrieden werden, auch wenn die ersten Erfolge einiger dieser Bemühungen und Initiativen ermutigend sind. Gefragt ist ein geschlossenes und gemeinsames Vorgehen, insbesondere in den drei Bereichen, die ich gerade genannt habe."@de9
"Κυρία Πρόεδρε, θα ήθελα να ευχαριστήσω το Κοινοβούλιο που διοργάνωσε αυτήν τη συζήτηση για τον καρκίνο του μαστού. Ο ιδιαίτερα αναλυτικός χαρακτήρας των ερωτήσεων καταδεικνύει το ευρύ φάσμα των ζητημάτων που τίθενται. Δεν θα προσπαθήσω να απαντήσω σε κάθε ερώτηση ξεχωριστά· κάτι τέτοιο θα ήταν αδύνατον δεδομένου του περιορισμένου χρόνου αγόρευσης που διαθέτω. Ωστόσο, θα ήταν χαρά μου να σας παράσχω αργότερα λεπτομερή πληροφόρηση. Ασφαλώς, πρέπει να παραδεχτούμε ότι οι περισσότερες από τις εν λόγω δράσεις έχουν ως κύριο αποδέκτη τα κράτη μέλη, εντούτοις η Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση μπορεί να παράσχει και υποστήριξη –όπως στην περίπτωση της έρευνας– όπου αυτό είναι εφικτό Ενδεικτικά, αναφέρομαι στη μελλοντική υποστήριξη των κατευθυντήριων γραμμών για τη διάγνωση του καρκίνου του μαστού, η οποία θα συνεχιστεί στο πλαίσιο των υφιστάμενων και μελλοντικών προγραμμάτων στον τομέα της υγείας, του δικτύου του Ευρωπαϊκού Συμβουλίου και του δικτύου της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης για την πληροφόρηση σχετικά με τον καρκίνο στην Ευρώπη. Ένα νέο πρόγραμμα, το οποίο έχει μόλις επιλεγεί, απαντά σε ορισμένα από τα ερωτήματα σχετικά με την επέκταση των κατευθυντήριων γραμμών. Οι κατευθυντήριες γραμμές της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης θα ενημερωθούν, προκειμένου να καλύψουν όχι μόνον τον καθορισμό προτύπων για τους νοσηλευτές ασθενών με καρκίνο του μαστού αλλά και τις προδιαγραφές των εξειδικευμένων μονάδων μαστού. Θα θέσουν τα κριτήρια, τις αρχές και τα σημεία αναφοράς, σύμφωνα με τα οποία τα κράτη μέλη θα πρέπει να προσαρμόσουν τη διάγνωση, την κατάρτιση και τη θεραπεία του καρκίνου του μαστού. Οι πρωτοβουλίες αυτές θα καλύψουν την ανάγκη πληροφόρησης και διαβούλευσης και στα νέα κράτη μέλη, και θα συμβάλουν στην ενσωμάτωση των εμπλεκόμενων εμπειρογνωμόνων εντός των υφιστάμενων δικτύων. Δεν πρέπει να λησμονούμε ότι κάθε χρόνο περισσότερες από 250 000 γυναίκες εξαρτώνται από τέτοιου είδους δράσεις. Αυτές και οι οικογένειές τους εξαρτώνται από την προτεραιότητα που εμείς και τα κράτη μέλη θα δώσουμε σε ένα τόσο σημαντικό και σοβαρό πρόβλημα. Δεν πρέπει να τις απογοητεύσουμε. Θα επικεντρωθώ, συνεπώς, σε τρεις σημαντικούς τομείς, αλλά καταρχάς θα ήθελα να αναγνωρίσω το μέγεθος του προβλήματος, που έχει ήδη αναφερθεί από πολλούς ομιλητές. Κάθε χρόνο στην Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση γίνεται διάγνωση καρκίνου του μαστού σε 270 000 γυναίκες. Αυτό επηρεάζει τη ζωή τους και τη ζωή των οικογενειών τους, και το κόστος που συνεπάγεται από ιατρικής, κοινωνικής και οικονομικής άποψης είναι εξαιρετικά υψηλό. Το πρώτο ζήτημα στο οποίο θα αναφερθώ –και για το οποίο έχει ήδη γίνει λόγος– είναι πόσο έχουμε προοδεύσει από το ψήφισμα του Ευρωπαϊκού Κοινοβουλίου της 5ης Ιουνίου 2003. Πράγματι, το ψήφισμα έθεσε ορισμένους φιλόδοξους στόχους που έπρεπε να επιτύχουν τα κράτη μέλη έως το 2008, όπως η μείωση κατά 25% της θνησιμότητας και η μείωση σε 5% των αποκλίσεων που παρατηρούνται στα ποσοστά επιβίωσης από καρκίνο του μαστού μεταξύ των κρατών μελών. Οφείλω να ομολογήσω ότι είναι πολύ νωρίς για να γνωρίζουμε ακριβώς τον βαθμό προόδου που έχει σημειωθεί. Τα κράτη μέλη δεσμεύθηκαν να υποβάλουν έκθεση στην Επιτροπή σχετικά με την κατάσταση έως τα τέλη του τρέχοντος έτους, τρία χρόνια μετά την έγκριση των συστάσεων του Συμβουλίου. Η Επιτροπή θα προβεί, ως εκ τούτου, στην υποβολή έκθεσης εφαρμογής το 2007. Μπορώ να σας διαβεβαιώσω ότι η έλλειψη πληροφοριών από ορισμένα κράτη μέλη δεν θα καθυστερήσει την υποβολή της έκθεσης. Τουναντίον, η έκθεση θα καταδεικνύει τα κράτη μέλη που δεν έχουν παράσχει πληροφορίες. Υπάρχουν ήδη ενδείξεις ότι το ψήφισμα και άλλες δράσεις είχαν θετικά αποτελέσματα και έχουν αρχίσει να κάνουν τη διαφορά. Αναμένουμε πρόοδο σε πτυχές όπως η ανταλλαγή προτύπων βέλτιστων πρακτικών για τη διευκόλυνση της εφαρμογής σε διάφορα τμήματα της ΕΕ και οι κατευθυντήριες γραμμές σχετικά με τη διάγνωση, που μειώνουν σε πολύ μεγάλο βαθμό τη θνησιμότητα από καρκίνο του μαστού. Εκτός από την παροχή των αποτελεσμάτων για τη θνησιμότητα, ευελπιστούμε ότι θα έχουμε στη διάθεσή μας τα δεδομένα που θα μας βοηθήσουν να αποκτήσουμε μια σαφή εικόνα για τα χρονικά πλαίσια που υπάρχουν και τις εξελίξεις σε σχέση με τις ανισότητες. Ο δεύτερος γενικός τομέας στον οποίο θα ήθελα να αναφερθώ είναι η έρευνα. Ο καρκίνος του μαστού θα έχει σημαντική θέση στο έβδομο πρόγραμμα πλαίσιο, το οποίο θα καλύπτει τόσο την ανίχνευση της ασθένειας όσο και, κυρίως, τα αίτιά της – με άλλα λόγια, με ποιον τρόπο μπορεί να προληφθεί. Σε ό,τι αφορά την ανίχνευση, η έρευνα επικεντρώνεται κυρίως στη βελτίωση της διάγνωσης του καρκίνου του μαστού και στη χρήση εναλλακτικών μεθόδων αντί της συμβατικής μαστογραφίας, προκειμένου να βελτιωθεί ο έγκαιρος εντοπισμός. Μεταξύ των παραδειγμάτων που υποστηρίχθηκαν ήδη από το έκτο πρόγραμμα πλαίσιο είναι η μαστογραφία με μοριακή απεικόνιση ή η εφαρμογή τομογραφίας με εκπομπή ποζιτρονίων –PET– που σχεδιάσθηκε ειδικά για την εξέταση του καρκίνου του μαστού. Η έγκαιρη ανίχνευση είναι, ασφαλώς, πολύ σημαντική για τη διασφάλιση επιτυχούς θεραπείας, αλλά και πάλι αφορά τη θεραπεία της ασθένειας και όχι των αιτίων της. Χαίρομαι λοιπόν ιδιαίτερα, διότι η ενασχόληση με τα αίτια του καρκίνου αποτελεί προτεραιότητα του προγράμματος πλαισίου για την έρευνα. Το έργο αυτό θα καλύψει τους τρεις βασικούς τομείς: τη γενετική, το περιβάλλον και τον τρόπο ζωής. Τρίτον, το ζήτημα των εκστρατειών, δεδομένου ότι μπορούν να διαδραματίσουν πολύ σημαντικό ρόλο σε θέματα δημόσιας υγείας, αυξάνοντας την ευαισθητοποίηση σε βασικά θέματα των ατόμων, των δημοσίων αρχών και των φορέων λήψης αποφάσεων, καθώς επίσης και των ειδικών στον τομέα της υγείας. Όχι μόνον επιτρέπουν στα άτομα να βοηθήσουν και να προστατεύσουν τον εαυτό τους, αλλά ασκούν και πίεση στους φορείς λήψης αποφάσεων, ώστε να δώσουν προτεραιότητα στο εν λόγω πρόβλημα, κάτι που ορισμένες φορές παραλείπουν να πράξουν. Το ψήφισμα του Ευρωπαϊκού Κοινοβουλίου του 2003 αποτέλεσε σημαντικό τμήμα μιας συνεχιζόμενης εκστρατείας για την αύξηση της ευαισθητοποίησης. Η αύξηση της ευαισθητοποίησης μεταξύ των γυναικών για τη σημασία της διάγνωσης έχει αποτελέσει βασικό τμήμα της ευρωπαϊκής δράσης κατά του καρκίνου. Τέτοιου είδους εκστρατείες μπορούν να υποστηριχθούν από το πρόγραμμά μας για τη δημόσια υγεία. Εν κατακλείδι, όλοι συμφωνούμε ότι ο καρκίνος του μαστού πρέπει να αντιμετωπισθεί και τα παραδείγματα βέλτιστων πρακτικών καταδεικνύουν ότι μπορούν να επιτευχθούν σημαντικά αποτελέσματα. Ωστόσο, πρέπει να αντιληφθούμε ότι πρόκειται για μια διαρκή διαδικασία. Δεν πρέπει επ’ ουδενί να επαναπαυθούμε, ακόμα και αν παίρνουμε θάρρος από την αρχική επιτυχία ορισμένων από αυτές τις προσπάθειες και πρωτοβουλίες. Απαιτείται μια συνεκτική και συλλογική προσέγγιση, η οποία θα καλύπτει ειδικότερα τους τρεις τομείς που επισήμανα νωρίτερα."@el10
". Señora Presidenta, quisiera dar las gracias al Parlamento por organizar este debate sobre el cáncer de mama. Lo detallado de las preguntas refleja la amplitud de las cuestiones que implica. No voy a intentar responder por separado a todas las preguntas, porque eso sería imposible dado que mi tiempo de intervención es limitado. No obstante, me encantaría facilitarles información detallada en otro momento. Por supuesto, tenemos que admitir que la mayoría de estas acciones corresponden principalmente a los Estados miembros, pero la Unión Europea puede ayudar, y lo va a hacer –como en el caso de la investigación– siempre que sea posible. A título indicativo puedo mencionar el futuro apoyo a las directrices sobre el cribado para la detección del cáncer de mama, que continuará bajo los actuales y futuros programas de salud pública, la red del Consejo Europeo y la red de la Unión Europea para la información sobre el cáncer en Europa. Un nuevo proyecto que se ha preseleccionado responde a algunas de las preguntas sobre la extensión de las directrices. Las directrices de la Unión Europea se actualizarán para que abarquen no solo la fijación de normas para las enfermeras especializadas en cáncer de mama, sino también las especificaciones para las unidades especializadas en la mama. Fijarán normas, principios y parámetros de referencia a los que los Estados miembros deberán ajustar sus medidas de cribado, su formación y su tratamiento en el campo del cáncer de mama. Estas iniciativas incluirán la necesidad de información y consultas también en los nuevos Estados miembros y contribuirán a integrar a los expertos implicados en las redes actuales. No debemos olvidar nunca que cada año más de un cuarto de millón de mujeres dependen de esas medidas. Ellas y sus familias dependen de la prioridad que tanto nosotros como los Estados miembros concedamos a este importante y grave problema. No debemos defraudarles. Por lo tanto, voy a centrarme en tres aspectos cruciales, aunque primero quisiera dar fe de la magnitud del problema, que ya han mencionado muchos oradores. Cada año se diagnostica cáncer de mama a 270 000 mujeres en la Unión Europea. Eso afecta a sus vidas y a las vidas de sus familias y tiene un coste médico, social y económico muy significativo. La primera cuestión que quiero abordar –y que ya se ha tratado– es cuánto hemos avanzado desde la resolución del Parlamento Europeo del 5 de junio de 2003. Es cierto que la resolución fijó algunos objetivos ambiciosos que los Estados miembros debían alcanzar para 2008, especialmente una reducción del 25 % de la mortalidad y la reducción hasta el 5 % de las diferencias entre las tasas de supervivencia con cáncer de mama de los distintos Estados miembros. Debo admitir que es demasiado pronto para saber cuánto se ha avanzado exactamente. Los Estados miembros se han comprometido a informar a la Comisión sobre la situación antes de que concluya el año, tres años después de la aprobación de las recomendaciones del Consejo. Por lo tanto, la Comisión elaborará un informe de aplicación en 2007. Puedo asegurarles que la falta de información de algunos Estados miembros no retrasará la publicación de ese informe. Al contrario, el informe indicará qué Estados miembros no han facilitado información. Ya existen indicios de que la resolución y otras medidas han tenido efectos positivos y han comenzado a cambiar las cosas. Esperamos que los avances en aspectos como el intercambio de modelos de buenas prácticas para facilitar la aplicación en distintas partes de la UE y las directrices para diagnósticos de cribado den lugar a reducciones muy significativas de la mortalidad por cáncer de mama. Además de facilitar los resultados en el ámbito de la mortalidad, esperamos tener los datos necesarios para hacernos una idea clara de los plazos en cuestión y de los avances en la reducción de las desigualdades. El segundo aspecto del que quiero hablar es la investigación. El cáncer de mama tendrá una gran relevancia en el Séptimo Programa Marco. Este Programa abarcará tanto la detección de la enfermedad como otro aspecto crucial: las causas, es decir, cómo puede prevenirse. En lo que respecta a la detección, la investigación se centra ahora sobre todo en la mejora del cribado para detectar el cáncer de mama y las alternativas a la mamografía convencional, con el fin de mejorar la detección temprana. Entre las alternativas que ya apoya el Sexto Programa Marco figura la mamografía con imagen molecular o la aplicación de la tomografía por emisión de positrones (PET), concebida específicamente para la exploración del cáncer de mama. La detección precoz es desde luego vital para garantizar el éxito de la terapia, pero sigue tratando la enfermedad y no las causas. Por lo tanto, me complace que el trabajo sobre las causas del cáncer sea una prioridad en el Programa Marco de Investigación. Ese trabajo se centrará en tres áreas clave: la genética, el medio ambiente y el estilo de vida. En tercer lugar, la cuestión de las campañas: las campañas informativas tienen gran importancia en asuntos de salud pública, puesto que incrementan la sensibilización sobre aspectos importantes por parte de los ciudadanos, las autoridades públicas y las instancias decisorias, así como, por supuesto, de los profesionales sanitarios. Esto no solo permite a los ciudadanos protegerse mejor, sino que también presiona a las instancias decisorias para que den prioridad a este problema, cosa que a veces no hacen. La resolución de 2003 del Parlamento Europeo ha sido un componente eficaz de una compaña de concienciación que todavía está en curso. Concienciar a las mujeres sobre la importancia del cribado ha sido un aspecto clave de la acción europea contra el cáncer. Esas campañas pueden recibir apoyo al amparo de nuestro programa de salud pública. En conclusión, todos estamos de acuerdo en que es preciso luchar contra el cáncer de mama y los ejemplos de buenas prácticas demuestran que se pueden lograr resultados significativos. Sin embargo, es preciso entender que se trata de un proceso continuo. No debemos caer en la complacencia, ni siquiera ante el éxito inicial de algunos de esos esfuerzos e iniciativas. Se necesita un enfoque coherente y caracterizado por la colaboración, que aborde en particular los tres aspectos que he destacado anteriormente."@es20
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@et5
"Arvoisa puhemies, kiitän parlamenttia tämän rintasyöpää koskevan keskustelun järjestämisestä. Juuri kysymysten yksityiskohtaisuus on osoitus asian monitahoisuudesta. En yritä käsitellä jokaista kysymystä erikseen, sillä se olisi lyhyen puheaikani takia mahdotonta. Annan kuitenkin mielelläni yksityiskohtaisempaa tietoa myöhemmässä vaiheessa. Tietenkin on myönnettävä, että useimmat näistä toimista kuuluvat pääasiassa jäsenvaltioiden vastuulle, mutta Euroopan unioni voi ja tukea mahdollisuuksien mukaan muun muassa tutkimustoimintaa. Esimerkkeinä voin mainita tulevan tuen rintasyöpäseulontaa koskeville suuntaviivoille, joita jatketaan nykyisissä ja tulevissa terveysohjelmissa, sekä Eurooppa-neuvoston ja EU:n syöpätutkimusverkoston. Eräässä uudessa ehdolle päässeessä hankkeessa vastataan muutamiin suuntaviivojen laajentamista koskeviin kysymyksiin. Euroopan unionin suuntaviivat saatetaan ajan tasalle, jotta ne kattavat sekä rintasairauksiin erikoistuneiden sairaanhoitajien työnkuvan että rintasairauksiin erikoistuneita yksiköitä koskevat tarkemmat ohjeet. Näissä yksiköissä laaditaan normeja, periaatteita ja arviointiperusteita, joita jäsenvaltioiden on noudatettava rintasyöpäseulonnassa, koulutuksessa ja hoidoissa. Aloitteissa otetaan huomioon myös tiedon ja kuulemisen tarve uusissa jäsenvaltioissa ja autetaan kyseisen alan asiantuntijoita pääsemään mukaan nykyisiin verkkoihin. On pidettävä jatkuvasti mielessä, että joka vuosi yli neljännesmiljoona naista on riippuvaisia näistä toimista. He ja heidän perheensä ovat riippuvaisia siitä, miten paljon huomiota EU ja jäsenvaltiot kiinnittävät näin merkittävään ja vakavaan ongelmaan. Emme saa tuottaa heille pettymystä. Tästä syystä kiinnitän huomiota kolmeen keskeiseen alaan, mutta sitä ennen haluan tunnustaa ongelman merkityksen, jonka monet puhujat ovat jo maininneet. Euroopan unionissa todetaan vuosittain rintasyöpä 270 000 naisella. Tämä vaikuttaa heidän ja heidän perheidensä elämään ja aiheuttaa huomattavat terveydenhuolto-, sosiaali- ja talousmenot. Edistymistämme Euroopan parlamentin 5. kesäkuuta 2003 antaman päätöslauselman jälkeen on jo käsitelty, ja sivuan aluksi sitä. On totta, että päätöslauselmassa asetettiin jäsenvaltioiden täytettäväksi joitakin kunnianhimoisia tavoitteita vuoteen 2008 mennessä: rintasyöpäkuolleisuutta alennetaan 25 prosenttia ja rintasyöpäpotilaiden eloonjäämismahdollisuuksia koskevat jäsenvaltioiden väliset erot kavennetaan viiteen prosenttiin. Myönnän, että on liian aikaista selvittää tarkasti, kuinka paljon edistystä on saavutettu. Jäsenvaltiot ovat luvanneet antaa komissiolle selvityksen tilanteesta tämän vuoden loppuun mennessä, kolme vuotta neuvoston antamien suositusten jälkeen. Sen vuoksi komissio laatii täytäntöönpanokertomuksen vuonna 2007. Vakuutan, ettei joidenkin jäsenvaltioiden tietojen puuttuminen viivästytä kertomuksen laatimista. Sen sijaan kertomuksesta selviää, mitkä jäsenvaltiot eivät ole toimittaneet tietoja. Päätöslauselmalla ja muilla toimilla aikaansaadut myönteiset vaikutukset ja muutokset ovat jo nähtävissä. Tuloksia on odotettavissa muun muassa sellaisista näkökohdista, kuin parhaiden käytäntöjen mallien vaihtamisesta, jolla edistetään soveltamista EU:n eri osissa, ja diagnoosien seulontaa koskevista suuntaviivoista, joilla vähennetään merkittävästi rintasyöpäkuolleisuutta. Kuolleisuuteen liittyvien tulosten lisäksi toivomme saavamme tiedot, joiden avulla pystymme selvittämään tarkasti asianmukaiset määräajat ja eriarvoisuutta koskevan kehityksen. Toiseksi käsittelen yleisesti tutkimusalaa. Rintasyöpä on vahvasti esillä seitsemännessä puiteohjelmassa. Se kattaa sekä sairauden toteamisen että sen syyt, joilla on ratkaiseva merkitys taudin ennaltaehkäisyn kannalta. Sairauden toteamiseen liittyvissä tutkimuksissa keskitytään erityisesti parantamaan mammografiaseulontaa ja sairauden varhaista toteamista edistäviä tavanomaisen mammografian vaihtoehtoja. Kuudennen puiteohjelman mukaisesti tukea saavat esimerkiksi molekyylikuvantamiseen perustuva mammografia tai erityisesti rintasyöpätutkimukseen kehitetyn positroniemissiotomografian eli PET:n käyttö. Varhainen toteaminen on tietenkin ratkaisevaa hoidon onnistumisen kannalta, mutta se on silti pikemminkin sairauden kuin sen syiden hoitoa. Siksi olen erittäin tyytyväinen, että tutkimuksen puiteohjelman painopisteenä on syövän syiden selvittäminen. Tämä tutkimus kattaa perinnöllisyystieteen, ympäristön ja elintapojen kaltaiset keskeiset alat. Kolmanneksi käsittelen kampanjoita. Niillä voidaan lisätä huomattavasti yksityisten kansalaisten, viranomaisten ja päätöksentekijöiden sekä tietenkin terveydenhuollon ammattilaisten tietämystä keskeisistä kansanterveyskysymyksistä. Näin ei ainoastaan auteta ihmisiä auttamaan ja suojaamaan itseään vaan myös painostetaan päättäjiä asettamaan etusijalle tämä ongelma, jonka he toisinaan laiminlyövät. Euroopan parlamentin vuonna 2003 antamaa päätöslauselmaa on käytetty tarkoituksenmukaisesti käynnissä olevassa tiedotuskampanjassa. Naisille seulonnan merkityksestä annettu valistus on ollut keskeinen osa EU:n syöväntorjuntatoimia. Tällaisia kampanjoita voidaan tukea kansanterveysohjelmamme mukaisesti. Lopuksi totean meidän kaikkien olevan yksimielisiä siitä, että rintasyöpää on torjuttava ja että esimerkit parhaista käytännöistä todistavat mahdollisuudesta saavuttaa merkittäviä tuloksia. On kuitenkin ymmärrettävä, että prosessi on jatkuvasti käynnissä. Emme saa milloinkaan langeta itsetyytyväisyyteen, vaikka osalla näistä toimista ja aloitteista saavutettaisiinkin aluksi hyviä tuloksia. Tarvitaan johdonmukaista ja yhteistyöhön perustuvaa toimintamallia, joka kattaa erityisesti kolme aiemmin korostamaani näkökohtaa."@fi7
"Madame la Présidente, je voudrais remercier le Parlement pour avoir organisé ce débat sur le cancer du sein. Les détails mêmes des questions posées témoignent du large éventail de sujets concernés. Je ne vais pas essayer de répondre à chaque question séparément, mon temps de parole limité ne me le permet pas. Toutefois, je serais ravi de fournir des informations détaillées ultérieurement. Nous devons bien sûr reconnaître que la plupart de ces actions incombent essentiellement aux États membres, mais l’Union européenne peut aider ces derniers, et elle le fera - comme dans le cas de la recherche - chaque fois que c’est possible. À titre indicatif, je peux parler de l’aide future aux lignes directrices sur le dépistage du cancer du sein, qui se poursuivra dans le cadre des programmes de santé actuels et futurs, le réseau du Conseil européen et le réseau d’information sur le cancer en Europe de l’Union européenne. Un nouveau projet qui a à présent été sélectionné répond à certaines questions concernant l’extension des lignes directrices. Les lignes directrices européennes seront actualisées pour couvrir non seulement l’établissement de normes pour des infirmières spécialisées en cancer du sein, mais également les spécifications pour les unités spécialisées dans ce type de cancer. Elles établiront les normes, principes et références auxquels les États membres devront s’adapter en matière de formation, de traitement et de dépistage du cancer du sein. Ces initiatives couvriront la nécessité d’information et de consultation dans les nouveaux États membres et contribueront à intégrer les experts compétents dans les réseaux existants. Nous ne devons jamais oublier que plus d’un quart de million de femmes dépendent d’une telle action chaque année. Elles et leur famille dépendent de la priorité que nous accorderons, et que les États membres accorderont, à un problème aussi important et grave. Nous ne devons pas leur faire faux bond. Je vais donc me concentrer sur trois questions, mais je voudrais tout d’abord reconnaître l’ampleur du problème, qu’ont déjà mentionnée de nombreux orateurs. Chaque année, en Europe, il y a 270 000 nouveaux cas de cancer du sein. Ce diagnostic affecte la vie de ces femmes et de leur famille, et il a un coût médical, social et économique très élevé. La première question que je voudrais aborder - et je ne suis pas le premier à le faire - concerne les progrès que nous avons réalisés depuis la résolution du Parlement européen du 5 juin 2003. Certes, cette résolution fixait des objectifs ambitieux que les États membres devaient atteindre pour 2008, notamment réduire de 25 % le taux de mortalité et ramener à 5 % les disparités des taux de survie entre les États membres. Je dois reconnaître qu’il est trop tôt pour savoir exactement les progrès qui ont été consentis. Les États membres se sont engagés à faire un rapport de bilan à la Commission pour la fin de cette année, trois ans après l’adoption des recommandations du Conseil. La Commission présentera donc un rapport de mise en œuvre en 2007. Je peux vous assurer que nous présenterons ce rapport dans les temps, même si certains États membres ne fournissent pas d’informations; en lieu et place, le rapport mentionnera les États membres en défaut. Il y a déjà des signes que la résolution et d’autres actions ont eu des effets positifs et ont commencé à faire la différence. Nous prévoyons des avancées dans des domaines tels que l’échange de modèles de meilleures pratiques pour faciliter la mise en œuvre dans les différentes régions de l’Union et les lignes directrices sur le dépistage et le diagnostic, permettant de réduire fortement le taux de mortalité lié au cancer du sein. En plus de donner les résultats concernant la mortalité, nous espérons disposer des données nous permettant de donner une idée claire du calendrier et de l’évolution concernant les disparités. Je voudrais ensuite aborder la question de la recherche. Le cancer du sein sera l’un des grands protagonistes du septième programme-cadre. Ce dernier couvrira la détection mais aussi les causes de la maladie - en d’autres termes, la manière dont elle peut être prévenue -, et c’est essentiel. Concernant la détection, la recherche se concentre essentiellement sur l’amélioration du dépistage du cancer du sein et sur les alternatives à la mammographie conventionnelle, afin d’améliorer la détection précoce. Parmi les exemples déjà financés dans le cadre du sixième programme-cadre, je peux citer la mammographie par imagerie moléculaire ou la tomographie par émission de positrons (TEP), spécialement conçue pour le dépistage du cancer du sein. La détection précoce est, de toute évidence, essentielle à la réussite du traitement, mais il s’agit encore de traitement et non de prévention. Je me réjouis donc sincèrement que les travaux relatifs à la prévention constituent une priorité du programme-cadre de recherche; ils engloberont les facteurs génétiques, l’environnement et le style de vie. Enfin, je souhaiterais parler des campagnes, qui peuvent jouer un rôle très important dans la santé publique, dans la sensibilisation des citoyens, des autorités publiques, des responsables politiques et des professionnels de la santé aux principaux problèmes. Non seulement elles permettent aux personnes de mieux se protéger, mais elles font également pression sur les responsables politiques afin qu’ils accordent la priorité à ce problème, ce qu’ils ne font parfois pas. La résolution que le Parlement européen a adoptée en 2003 a été un élément efficace d’une campagne de sensibilisation permanente. L’action européenne contre le cancer s’est concentrée sur la sensibilisation des femmes à l’importance du dépistage. Ce type de campagnes peut être financé dans le cadre de notre programme de santé publique. En conclusion, nous convenons tous qu’il faut s’attaquer au cancer du sein et qu’il est possible d’obtenir de bons résultats, comme en témoignent les exemples de meilleures pratiques. Toutefois, nous devons comprendre qu’il s’agit d’un processus permanent. Nous ne devons pas baisser la garde, en dépit de la réussite initiale de certains de ces efforts et initiatives. Il faut une approche cohérente et collaborative, couvrant en particulier les trois aspects que je viens de souligner."@fr8
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@hu11
". Signora Presidente, desidero ringraziare il Parlamento per aver organizzato questo dibattito sul tumore al seno. La puntualità stessa delle interrogazioni illustra l’ampia gamma di tematiche coinvolte. Non cercherò ora di affrontare ogni punto separatamente; sarebbe un compito impossibile, visto il mio tempo di parola limitato. Sarò tuttavia lieto di fornire informazioni più dettagliate in una fase successiva. Dobbiamo naturalmente ammettere che la maggior parte di queste azioni deve essere svolta principalmente dagli Stati membri, ma l’Unione europea può e fornire sostegno – come nel settore della ricerca – laddove possibile. A titolo indicativo posso fare riferimento al sostegno che si prevede di dare in futuro alle linee guida per lo del tumore al seno, che sarà condotto nell’ambito dell’attuale programma per la sanità e anche in quelli futuri, la rete del Consiglio europeo e la rete dell’Unione europea per l’informazione sul cancro in Europa. Un nuovo progetto che è stato ora inserito nella rosa dei candidati risponde ad alcune delle domande relative all’ampliamento delle linee guida. Le linee guida dell’Unione europea saranno aggiornate: non si limiteranno più alla definizione del profilo professionale per le infermiere specializzate nel cancro al seno, ma si occuperanno anche del protocollo di certificazione delle unità mammarie specializzate. Definiranno le norme, i principi e i parametri di riferimento rispetto ai quali gli Stati membri dovranno adeguare i loro programmi di formazione e trattamento per il tumore al seno. Tali iniziative riguarderanno altresì le necessità di informazione e consultazione nei nuovi Stati membri e contribuiranno a integrare gli esperti competenti nelle reti esistenti. Non dobbiamo mai dimenticare che, ogni anno, oltre 250 000 donne dipendono da queste azioni. Queste donne e le loro famiglie dipendono dalla priorità che noi e gli Stati membri attribuiremo a un problema di tale importanza e gravità. Non possiamo deluderle. Mi concentrerò pertanto su tre settori fondamentali, ma innanzi tutto vorrei confermare l’entità del problema, già ricordata da molti oratori. Nell’Unione europea ogni anno, a 270 000 donne è diagnosticato un cancro al seno. E’ un evento che ha un impatto sulla loro vita e sulla vita delle loro famiglie e ha un costo medico, sociale ed economico molto elevato. Il primo tema cui vorrei accennare – ed è stato già affrontato – è quello dei progressi compiuti rispetto alla risoluzione del Parlamento europeo del 5 giugno 2003. E’ vero che la risoluzione aveva definito obiettivi ambiziosi che gli Stati membri avrebbero dovuto realizzare entro il 2008, e segnatamente una riduzione del 25 per cento del tasso di mortalità e il contenimento fino al 5 per cento delle differenze esistenti tra gli Stati membri per quanto riguarda la sopravvivenza alla malattia. Devo ammettere che è ancora troppo presto per misurare con esattezza i progressi compiuti. Gli Stati membri si sono impegnati a riferire alla Commissione in merito alla situazione entro la fine di quest’anno, tre anni dopo l’adozione delle raccomandazioni del Consiglio. La Commissione produrrà pertanto una relazione sull’attuazione nel 2007. Vi posso garantire che l’assenza di informazioni da parte di alcuni Stati membri non ritarderà la stesura della relazione, anzi, la relazione indicherà quali sono gli Stati membri che non hanno fornito le informazioni richieste. Ci sono già alcuni segnali che indicano che la risoluzione e le altre azioni hanno prodotto effetti positivi e hanno cominciato a fare la differenza. Ci aspettiamo che ulteriori progressi relativamente ad aspetti, quali lo scambio di modelli di migliori pratiche, possano facilitare l’applicazione nelle diverse regioni dell’Unione europea e che le linee guida per lo consentano riduzioni significative del tasso di mortalità dovuto al cancro al seno. Oltre ai risultati in termini di mortalità, speriamo anche di poter ottenere i dati che ci consentano poi di avere un’idea chiara dei tempi e dell’evoluzione in termini di disuguaglianze. Il secondo aspetto di carattere generale di cui vorrei discutere riguarda la ricerca. Il cancro al seno occuperà un ruolo di rilievo nel settimo programma quadro, che si concentrerà sulla diagnosi della malattia e, soprattutto, sulle sue cause – in altri termini, sul modo di prevenirla. Per quanto riguarda la diagnosi, la ricerca si concentra in particolare sul miglioramento dello del tumore al seno e sulle alternative alla mammografia tradizionale, per migliorare la diagnosi precoce. Tra gli esempi già contenuti nel sesto programma quadro, abbiamo la mammografia con molecolare o l’applicazione della tomografia ad emissione di positroni – PET – studiata in particolare per l’esame del cancro al seno. La diagnosi precoce è naturalmente cruciale in vista dell’esito positivo del trattamento, ma siamo ancora a livello di trattamento della malattia piuttosto che intervento sulle cause. Mi fa pertanto molto piacere constatare che il lavoro sulle cause dei tumori figura tra le priorità del programma quadro di ricerca. Tale lavoro si occuperà dei tre settori fondamentali: genetica, ambiente e stile di vita. Terzo, il tema delle campagne. Le campagne possono svolgere un ruolo molto importante nell’ambito di tutte le tematiche legate alla sanità pubblica, nell’opera di sensibilizzazione sui temi centrali da parte di privati, autorità pubbliche e decisori, nonché, naturalmente, da parte degli operatori medici e sanitari. Non solo permettono ai singoli di tutelarsi personalmente, ma esercitano pressione anche sui decisori, perché privilegino l’attenzione a questo problema, cosa che non sempre fanno. La risoluzione del Parlamento europeo del 2003 ha costituito parte integrante e sostanziale di una campagna di sensibilizzazione permanente. L’opera di sensibilizzazione tra le donne sull’importanza dello ha svolto un ruolo fondamentale nell’azione europea di lotta contro il cancro. Tali campagne possono essere sostenute nell’ambito del nostro programma per la sanità pubblica. In conclusione, siamo tutti d’accordo: il tumore al seno è un problema che deve essere affrontato e gli esempi di buone pratiche dimostrano che è possibile ottenere risultati significativi. Tuttavia, dobbiamo capire che è un processo in continua evoluzione. Non dobbiamo mai cedere alla tentazione di sederci sugli allori, anche se siamo incoraggiati dal successo iniziale, frutto del nostro impegno e delle iniziative avviate. E’ necessaria una strategia coerente e collaborativa, che tenga in particolare conto dei tre aspetti che ho precedentemente citato."@it12
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@lt14
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@lv13
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@mt15
". Mevrouw de Voorzitter, ik wil graag het Parlement bedanken voor het organiseren van dit debat over borstkanker. Uit de zeer gedetailleerde vragen blijkt hoeveel verschillende kwesties hiermee samenhangen. Ik zal niet proberen om op iedere vraag apart in te gaan; dat zou een onmogelijke opgave zijn gezien mijn beperkte spreektijd. Ik wil echter met alle genoegen in een later stadium gedetailleerdere informatie verstrekken. We moeten uiteraard toegeven dat de meeste van deze initiatieven in de eerste plaats een taak zijn voor de lidstaten, maar de Europese Unie kan en net als op het gebied van onderzoek – steun bieden waar zij kan. Dit blijkt bijvoorbeeld uit de ondersteuning voor de richtsnoeren voor borstkankerscreening, die zal plaatsvinden binnen het kader van het huidige en het toekomstige volksgezondheidsprogramma, het netwerk van de Europese Raad en het EU-netwerk voor de informatie over kanker in Europa. Er is een nieuw project voorgedragen, dat antwoord geeft op enkele van de vragen over uitbreiding van de richtsnoeren. De EU-richtsnoeren zullen zodanig worden aangepast dat er niet alleen normen worden opgesteld voor borstkankerverpleegkundigen, maar ook dat er specificaties komen voor speciale borstcentra. Er zullen normen, principes en maatstaven komen waaraan de lidstaten hun screening, opleiding en behandeling op het gebied van borstkanker moeten aanpassen. In deze initiatieven wordt ook rekening gehouden met de behoefte aan informatie en advies in de nieuwe lidstaten; tevens zullen ze ertoe bijdragen dat de relevante deskundigen worden opgenomen in bestaande netwerken. We mogen nooit vergeten dat er elk jaar bijna een kwart miljoen vrouwen afhankelijk zijn van dit soort initiatieven. Zij en hun familieleden zijn afhankelijk van de prioriteit die wij en de lidstaten aan dit belangrijke en serieuze probleem zullen geven. We mogen ze niet in de steek laten. Voordat ik inga op drie hoofdpunten, wil ik eerst nog even zeggen dat het inderdaad, zoals veel sprekers hebben gezegd, een groot probleem is. Elk jaar wordt bij 270 000 vrouwen in de Europese Unie de diagnose borstkanker gesteld. Dat is van grote invloed op hun leven en op dat van hun familieleden en het brengt aanzienlijke medische, sociale en economische kosten met zich mee. Het eerste punt waarop ik graag wil ingaan – een punt dat al eerder is genoemd – betreft de vooruitgang die we hebben geboekt sinds de resolutie van het Europees Parlement van 5 juni 2003. Het is waar dat er in de resolutie enkele ambitieuze doelen waren gesteld die de lidstaten in 2008 bereikt zouden moeten hebben, in het bijzonder een daling van 25 procent van het sterftecijfer en een verkleining van het verschil in overlevingskansen van borstkankerpatiënten in de lidstaten tot 5 procent. Ik moet toegeven dat het nog te vroeg is om precies te kunnen zeggen hoeveel vooruitgang er is geboekt. De lidstaten hebben beloofd om aan het einde van dit jaar, drie jaar nadat de aanbevelingen van de Raad zijn aangenomen, verslag uit te brengen aan de Commissie over de stand van zaken. De Commissie zal daarom in 2007 met een uitvoeringsverslag komen. Ik kan u verzekeren dat de publicatie van het verslag niet zal worden vertraagd doordat bepaalde lidstaten hebben verzuimd gegevens te verstrekken. In plaats daarvan zullen die lidstaten expliciet in het verslag worden genoemd. Er zijn al signalen dat de resolutie en andere maatregelen positieve effecten hebben gehad en derhalve al zinvol blijken te zijn. We verwachten vooruitgang op punten zoals de uitwisseling van informatie over de beste praktijken, opdat deze overal in de EU kunnen worden toegepast, en de richtsnoeren voor het screenen op borstkanker, waardoor het sterftecijfer aanzienlijk kan worden verlaagd. Naast de resultaten ten aanzien van het sterftecijfer hopen we ook over gegevens te beschikken die ons een duidelijk beeld verschaffen van de hoeveelheid tijd die nodig zal zijn om bestaande ongelijkheden weg te werken en de vorderingen die daarmee zijn gemaakt. Het tweede algemene punt waarover ik het graag wil hebben, is onderzoek. Borstkanker zal een belangrijke plaats innemen in het zevende kaderprogramma. De aandacht zal hierbij zowel zijn gericht op opsporing van de ziekte als – en dat is zeer cruciaal – op de oorzaken, met andere woorden: hoe de ziekte kan worden voorkomen. Wat de opsporing betreft richt het onderzoek zich vooral op het verbeteren van de screening op borstkanker en op alternatieven voor de conventionele mammografie om de ziekte in een zo vroeg mogelijk stadium op te sporen. Onder het zesde kaderprogramma vielen bijvoorbeeld al mammografie met moleculaire beeldvorming en de toepassing van positronemissietomografie – PET – en dan speciaal ontwikkeld voor borstkankeronderzoek. Hoe vroeger de ziekte wordt opgespoord, des te groter is de kans op een succesvolle behandeling. Het gaat dan echter nog steeds om het behandelen van de ziekte en niet om het voorkomen. Daarom verheugt het mij zeer dat het onderzoek naar de oorzaken een prioriteit is in het kaderprogramma. Dat onderzoek richt zich op drie sleutelfactoren: genetica, milieu en levenswijze. Het derde punt dat ik wil noemen is de noodzaak van campagnes: deze kunnen een zeer belangrijke rol spelen bij volksgezondheidsvraagstukken, omdat ze individuen, autoriteiten en beleidsvormers, en uiteraard hen die werkzaam zijn in de gezondheidszorg bewuster maken van belangrijke aspecten. Daardoor krijgen individuen niet alleen meer grip op hun eigen situatie, maar worden beleidsmakers ook aangespoord om voorrang te geven aan dit probleem, wat zij soms verzuimen. De resolutie van het Europees Parlement van 2003 is een effectief onderdeel geweest van een continue bewustmakingscampagne. Vrouwen bewust maken van het belang van screening is een essentieel onderdeel geweest van de Europese initiatieven in de strijd tegen borstkanker. Dergelijke campagnes kunnen worden gesteund via ons volksgezondheidsprogramma. Tot besluit wil ik opmerken dat we het er allemaal over eens zijn dat borstkanker moet worden bestreden en uit voorbeelden van de beste praktijken weten we dat er waardevolle resultaten kunnen worden bereikt. We moeten echter beseffen dat het een continu proces is. We mogen nooit zelfvoldaan achterover leunen, ook al zijn we optimistisch geworden door het aanvankelijke succes van bepaalde inspanningen en initiatieven. Er is een coherente en op samenwerking geschoeide aanpak nodig, die met name gericht is op de drie aspecten die ik hiervoor al heb genoemd."@nl3
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@pl16
"Senhora Presidente, gostaria de agradecer ao Parlamento por ter organizado o presente debate sobre o cancro da mama. O próprio grau de detalhe das perguntas demonstra o vasto alcance das questões envolvidas. Não vou tentar abordar as perguntas separadamente; seria uma tarefa impossível, dado o limitado tempo de uso da palavra de que disponho. Terei, no entanto, todo o prazer em fornecer informações mais pormenorizadas numa fase posterior. Temos, naturalmente, de reconhecer que a maior parte destas acções compete principalmente aos Estados-Membros, mas a União Europeia pode e proporcionar apoio nos casos em que – na investigação, por exemplo – tal seja possível. A título indicativo, posso referir o futuro apoio às directrizes para rastreio do cancro da mama, que vai prosseguir ao abrigo dos presentes e futuros programas de saúde, da rede do Conselho Europeu e da rede da União Europeia para a informação sobre o cancro na Europa. Um novo projecto que foi agora seleccionado responde a algumas das perguntas relativamente à extensão das directrizes. As directrizes da União Europeia vão ser actualizadas para abarcar não apenas o estabelecimento de normas para as enfermeiras especializadas em cancro da mama, mas também a especificação para unidades de senologia. Serão, assim, estabelecidas as normas, os princípios e as avaliações comparativas a que os Estados-Membros vão ter de ajustar localmente o rastreio, a formação de técnicos e o tratamento do cancro da mama. Tais iniciativas contemplarão igualmente a necessidade de informação e consulta nos novos Estados-Membros e pretendem ajudar a integrar os especialistas do sector nas redes existentes. Não podemos esquecer jamais que, em cada ano que passa, há mulheres, mais de um quarto de milhão, que dependem deste tipo de acção. Elas e as suas famílias dependem da prioridade que nós e os Estados-Membros dermos a este importante e grave problema. Não podemos decepcioná-las. Abordarei, portanto, três áreas-chave, mas, primeiro, gostaria de reconhecer a magnitude do problema, facto já mencionado por muitos oradores. A cada ano que passa, é diagnosticado cancro da mama a 270 000 mulheres na União Europeia, o que afecta as suas próprias vidas, as vidas das suas famílias, a par do importante impacto em termos de custos médicos, sociais e económicos. O primeiro tema sobre o qual gostaria de me debruçar – já foi, inclusive, abordado – é o caminho já percorrido desde a resolução de 5 Junho de 2003 do Parlamento Europeu. É verdade que a resolução estabeleceu alguns objectivos ambiciosos a atingir pelos Estados-Membros até 2008, nomeadamente a redução em 25% da taxa média de mortalidade e a diminuição, para 5%, da disparidade que se verifica na taxa de sobrevivência entre os diversos Estados-Membros. Tenho de admitir que é demasiado cedo para quantificarmos com exactidão os progressos que entretanto foram obtidos. Os Estados-Membros comprometeram-se a apresentar à Comissão um relatório sobre a situação, fazendo-o até ao final do corrente ano, três anos após a adopção das recomendações do Conselho. A Comissão apresentará, portanto, em 2007, um relatório das medidas tomadas pelos Estados. Posso assegurar a V. Exas. que a falta de informação de alguns Estados-Membros não atrasará a apresentação do relatório. Em vez disso, o relatório identificará os Estados-Membros que não forneceram as necessárias informações. Já há sinais de que a resolução e outras acções empreendidas tiveram efeitos positivos e começaram a marcar a diferença. Aguardamos progressos em aspectos, tais como o intercâmbio de modelos de boas práticas para facilitar a aplicação em diferentes partes da UE, bem como as directrizes para diagnósticos no âmbito do rastreio do cancro, proporcionando algumas reduções muito significativas da mortalidade causada pelo cancro da mama. Adicionalmente aos resultados sobre a mortalidade, esperamos dispor dos dados que nos permitam ter uma imagem clara dos lapsos de tempo envolvidos, bem como dos desenvolvimentos relativamente às desigualdades na saúde. O segundo domínio geral que gostaria de abordar é a investigação. O cancro da mama vai estar em grande destaque no âmbito do Sétimo Programa-Quadro, abrangendo, quer a detecção da doença, quer, o que é muito importante, as suas causas – por outras palavras, a forma como pode ser evitada. Relativamente à detecção, a investigação está a incidir de modo especial na melhoria do rastreio do cancro da mama e nas alternativas à mamografia convencional, de modo a aumentar a detecção precoce. Exemplos já apoiados no âmbito do Sexto Programa-Quadro incluem mamografias com imagem molecular ou a aplicação da PET, ou Tomografia de Emissão de Positrões, especificamente destinada ao exame do cancro da mama. Obviamente que a detecção precoce é fundamental para assegurar um tratamento bem sucedido, mas continua-se no domínio do tratamento da doença e não na descoberta da sua causa. Nesta perspectiva, muito me apraz que o trabalho sobre as causas do cancro constitua uma prioridade no âmbito do Programa-Quadro de Investigação. Tal trabalho incidirá sobre as vertentes essenciais da genética, do ambiente e do estilo de vida. Em terceiro lugar, o lançamento de campanhas que podem desempenhar um importante papel em matéria de saúde pública, na sensibilização para questões essenciais por parte das entidades privadas, das autoridades públicas e dos decisores, bem como, obviamente, dos profissionais de saúde. Deste modo, possibilita-se não só que os indivíduos ajudem e se protejam a si próprios, mas também se exerce pressão sobre os decisores para que dêem prioridade a este problema, algo que estes nem sempre fazem. A resolução de 2003 do Parlamento Europeu tem sido parte eficaz de uma campanha em curso para aumentar a sensibilização. A sensibilização entre as mulheres para a importância do rastreio tem desempenhado um papel fundamental na acção ao nível comunitário contra o cancro. Campanhas deste tipo podem ser apoiadas no âmbito do nosso programa de saúde pública. Resumindo e concluindo, todos estamos de acordo em que o cancro da mama tem de ser enfrentado e os exemplos de boas práticas demonstram que podem ser obtidos importantes resultados. Temos, no entanto, de entender que se trata de um processo contínuo, nunca nos podemos tornar complacentes, mesmo que a tal sejamos induzidos pelo êxito inicial de alguns desses esforços e iniciativas. Necessitamos de uma abordagem coerente e colaborante, incidindo em especial sobre os três aspectos que destaquei anteriormente."@pt17
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@sk18
"Madam President, I should like to thank Parliament for having organised this debate on breast cancer. The very detail of the questions shows the wide range of issues involved. I will not try to address every question separately; that would be an impossible task, given my limited speaking time. However, I would be very happy to provide detailed information at a later stage. Of course, we have to admit that most of these actions are principally for the Member States, but the European Union can and provide support – as in the case of research – where possible. As an indication, I can refer to future support for breast cancer screening guidelines, which will continue under the current and future health programmes, the European Council network and the European Union network for information on cancer in Europe. A new project that has now been shortlisted answers some of the questions relating to the extension of the guidelines. The European Union guidelines will be updated to cover not only the setting of standards for breast cancer nurses but also the specification for specialist breast units. They will set the standards, principles and benchmarks to which Member States will have to adjust their breast cancer screening, training and treatment. These initiatives will cover the need for information and consultation in the new Member States as well and will help to integrate the relevant experts within existing networks. We must never forget that each year more than a quarter of a million women depend on such action. They and their families depend on the priority we and the Member States will give to such an important and serious problem. We must not let them down. I shall therefore focus on three key areas, but first I should like to acknowledge the magnitude of the problem, already mentioned by many speakers. Every year, 270 000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the European Union. That affects their lives and the lives of their families and it has a very significant medical, social and economic cost. The first issue I should like to touch upon – and it has already been addressed – is how far we have come since the European Parliament’s resolution of 5 June 2003. It is true that the resolution set out some ambitious targets for the Member States to reach by 2008, notably a 25% reduction in mortality and a reduction in differences between breast cancer survival rates in the Member States to 5%. I have to admit that it is too early to know exactly how much progress has been made. Member States have committed themselves to report to the Commission on the situation by the end of this year, three years after the adoption of the Council recommendations. The Commission will therefore produce an implementation report in 2007. I can assure you that the lack of information from some Member States will not delay production of the report. Instead, the report will indicate the Member States that have not provided the information. There are already signs that the resolution and other actions have had positive effects and started to make a difference. We expect progress on aspects such as the exchange of best practice models to facilitate application in different parts of the EU and the guidelines for screening diagnosis, delivering some very significant reductions in breast cancer mortality. In addition to providing the results on mortality, we hope to have the data to be able to set out a clear picture of the timeframes involved and developments as regards inequalities. The second general area I should like to touch upon is research. Breast cancer will feature strongly under the Seventh Framework Programme. This will cover both the detection of the disease and, crucially, the causes – in other words, how it can be prevented. As regards detection, research is focusing notably on improving breast cancer screening and alternatives to conventional mammography, in order to improve early detection. Examples already supported under the Sixth Framework Programme include mammography with molecular imaging or the application of positron emission tomography – PET – specifically designed for breast cancer examination. Early detection is, of course, crucial in ensuring successful treatment, but that is still treating the disease rather than the causes. I am therefore very pleased that work on the causes of cancer is a priority in the Research Framework Programme. That work will cover the three key areas of genetics, environment and lifestyle. Thirdly, the issue of campaigns: these can play a very important role in public health issues, in raising awareness of key issues by private individuals, public authorities and decision-makers, as well as, of course, health professionals. Not only does it enable individuals to help and protect themselves, it also puts pressure on the decision-makers to give priority to this problem, which they sometimes fail to do. The European Parliament’s 2003 resolution has been an effective part of an ongoing campaign to increase awareness. Awareness-raising among women on the importance of screening has been a key part of European action against cancer. Such campaigns can be supported under our public health programme. In conclusion, we all agree that breast cancer has to be tackled and best practice examples show that significant results can be achieved. However, we have to understand that it is a continuous process. We must never become complacent, even if we are encouraged by the initial success of some of those efforts and initiatives. A coherent and collaborative approach is needed, covering in particular the three aspects I highlighted earlier."@sl19
"Fru talman! Jag skulle vilja tacka parlamentet för att ha anordnat denna debatt om bröstcancer. Redan de utförliga frågeställningarna visar bredden på de problem som det handlar om. Jag ska inte försöka mig på att ta upp varje fråga separat, vilket skulle vara omöjligt med tanke på min begränsade talartid. Det skulle dock glädja mig mycket att ge mer utförliga uppgifter vid ett senare tillfälle. Vi måste naturligtvis erkänna att dessa åtgärder i huvudsak gäller för medlemsstaterna, men Europeiska unionen kan också, och att, tillhandahålla stöd – som i fallet med forskning – där det är möjligt. Som en fingervisning kan jag hänvisa till stöd för riktlinjer för bröstcancerscreening, ett stöd som kommer att fortsätta under pågående och framtida hälsoprogram, i Europeiska rådets nätverk och Europeiska unionens nätverk för information om cancer inom EU. Ett nytt projekt har nu satts upp på slutlistan som svar på några av de frågor som hör samman med utökningen av riktlinjerna. Europeiska unionens riktlinjer kommer att uppdateras för att inte bara täcka fastställandet av normer för bröstcancersköterskor, utan också specifikationer för specialistenheter för bröst. Härigenom kommer normer, principer och riktmärken att fastställas, och medlemsstaterna kommer att tvingas anpassa sin bröstcancerscreening, utbildning och behandling till dessa. Dessa initiativ kommer att täcka behovet av information och rådgivning i de nya medlemsstaterna samt bidra till att integrera de relevanta experterna inom befintliga nätverk. Vi får aldrig glömma bort att över en kvarts miljon kvinnor är beroende av sådana åtgärder varje år. De och deras familjer är beroende av den prioritet som vi och medlemsstaterna ger dessa viktiga och allvarliga frågor. Vi får inte svika dem. Jag ska därför inrikta mig på tre nyckelområden, men först skulle jag vilja framhålla problemets omfattning, som flera talare redan nämnt. Varje år får 270 000 kvinnor diagnosen bröstcancer inom Europeiska unionen. Detta påverkar deras och deras familjers liv, och bröstcancer är en mycket stor medicinsk, social och ekonomisk kostnad. Det första frågan som jag skulle vilja ta upp – och den har redan berörts – är hur långt vi har kommit sedan Europaparlamentets resolution av den 5 juni 2003. Det stämmer att man i den resolutionen fastställde vissa ambitiösa mål för medlemsstaterna som ska nås före 2008, särskilt en 25-procentig minskning av dödssiffran och en minskning av skillnader i överlevnad i bröstcancer till 5 procent mellan medlemsstaterna. Jag måste erkänna att det är alltför tidigt för att exakt kunna säga hur stora framsteg som gjorts. Medlemsstaterna har åtagit sig att rapportera till kommissionen om situationen i slutet av detta år, tre år efter antagandet av rådets rekommendationer. Kommissionen kommer därför att utarbeta en genomföranderapport 2007. Jag kan försäkra er om att bristen på uppgifter från vissa medlemsstater inte kommer att försena utarbetandet av rapporten. I rapporten kommer det i stället att anges att medlemsstaterna inte har tillhandahållit dessa uppgifter. Det finns redan tecken på att resolutionen och andra åtgärder har fått positiva effekter och börjat medföra en förändring. Vi förväntar oss framsteg när det gäller sådana aspekter som utbyte av bästa metoder för att underlätta tillämpningen i olika delar av EU och riktlinjer för massundersökningar, som kan ge ett mycket lägre dödlighetstal för bröstcancer. Förutom att tillhandahålla resultaten om dödlighet hoppas vi ha uppgifter för att kunna göra oss en tydlig bild av de tidsramar som det handlar om och av utvecklingen när det gäller skillnader. Det andra allmänna område som jag skulle vilja nämna är forskning. Bröstcancer kommer att vara ett viktigt inslag i det sjunde ramprogrammet. Detta kommer att innefatta både upptäckten av sjukdomen och framför allt dess orsaker – med andra ord, hur den kan förebyggas. När det gäller upptäckt är forskningen inriktad på att förbättra bröstcancerscreening och alternativ till konventionell mammografi för att förbättra tidig upptäckt. De exempel som redan stöds inom ramen för det sjätte ramprogrammet inbegriper mammografi med molekylärbild eller tillämpning av positronemissionstomografi (PET), särskilt utformat för bröstcancerundersökning. Tidigt upptäckt är naturligtvis avgörande för att garantera en framgångsrik behandling, men det handlar fortfarande om att behandla sjukdomen snarare än ta itu med orsakerna. Jag är därför mycket nöjd med att arbetet med cancerorsakerna prioriteras inom forskningsramprogrammet. Detta arbete kommer att omfatta de tre nyckelområdena genetik, miljö och livsstil. För det tredje, frågan om kampanjer: de kan spela en mycket viktig roll för allmänna hälsofrågor när det gäller att öka medvetenheten hos enskilda individer, offentliga myndigheter och beslutsfattare samt naturligtvis vårdgivare. Detta möjliggör inte bara för enskilda att hjälpa till att skydda sig själva, utan det sätter också press på beslutsfattare att prioritera detta problem, vilket de ibland misslyckas med. Europaparlamentets resolution från 2003 har utgjort en effektiv del av en pågående kampanj för att öka medvetenheten. Medvetenhetshöjning bland kvinnor om vikten av undersökning har varit en central del av de europeiska åtgärderna mot cancer. Sådana kampanjer kan få stöd genom vårt folkhälsoprogram. Sammanfattningsvis håller vi alla med om att vi måste ta itu med bröstcancern, och exempel på bästa metoder visar att betydande resultat kan uppnås. Men vi måste inse att detta är en pågående process. Vi får aldrig låta oss nöjas, även om vi blir uppmuntrade av de första framstegen i vissa av dessa ansträngningar och initiativ. Det krävs en sammanhängande och deltagande strategi, som i synnerhet täcker de tre aspekter som jag tidigare belyste."@sv21
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