Local view for "http://purl.org/linkedpolitics/eu/plenary/2006-04-05-Speech-3-331"

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". Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@en4
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"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@cs1
"Hr. formand, i de seneste par uger og måneder har vi vænnet os til hyppig pressedækning af nye udbrud af aviær influenza. Det seneste udbrud på en fjerkræfarm i Sazony blev bekræftet i dag. Vi har kunnet følge sygdommens udvikling på kort, efterhånden som vi har set den sprede sig fra land til land. Vi er alle direkte eller indirekte berørt. Vi - og især fjerkræsektoren - står over for en virkelig krise, der nødvendiggør en hurtig indsats. Dette er baggrunden for, at vi er her i aften. Jeg vil derfor først og fremmest takke Parlamentet, der har accepteret Kommissionens anmodning om uopsættelig forhandling. Jeg skylder især en tak til formanden for Udvalget om Landbrug og Udvikling af Landdistrikter, Joseph Daul, såvel som til de øvrige udvalgsmedlemmer for deres hurtige bidrag til og udtalelse om Kommissionens forslag. Dette er et klart udtryk for, at vi kan handle hurtigt, når dette er nødvendigt. De mange tilfælde af aviær influenza i EU har påvirket os. Selv om ofrene for aviær influenza primært har været vildfugle, har denne allerede haft en stor negativ indvirkning på forbruget af fjerkræ i mange medlemsstater. Indvirkningen på priserne har været forskellig i de enkelte lande, men generelt har priserne været under pres, og i nogle tilfælde er de faldet betydeligt. Som følge heraf befinder markedet for fjerkrækød sig i en usædvanlig alvorlig situation, og mange i fjerkræsektoren er i alvorlige vanskeligheder. Vi har allerede grebet ind. Siden krisen brød ud sidste efterår har Kommissionen ydet eksportrestitutioner for at støtte markedet. Virkningerne af disse foranstaltninger har imidlertid været begrænsede, ikke mindst som følge af de indførte importrestriktioner på vores eksport til mange tredjelande. Det fremgår klart, at vi ikke kan håndtere krisen på fjerkræmarkedet effektivt udelukkende ved hjælp af eksportrestitutioner. Medlemsstaterne har også meddelt eller taget initiativer med hensyn til muligheden for at yde statsstøtte. Der er en lang række muligheder for bistand via statsstøtte som f.eks. støtte til redning og omstrukturering til landmænd i krise. Formålet med disse bestemmelser er at yde hurtig og effektiv støtte til de personer i sektoren, der virkelig har behov herfor. I lyset af krisen vil vi undersøge alle forslag så hurtigt som muligt under hensyntagen til behovet for hurtig hjælp og behovet for at undgå konkurrenceforvridning. Vi bliver imidlertid også nødt til at overveje alternative foranstaltninger på EU-niveau. Den gældende lovgivning har i denne forbindelse udgjort en hindring. Ifølge bestemmelserne i den gældende fælles markedsordning kan der træffes undtagelsesforanstaltninger til støtte for markedet, når der er blevet indført veterinære restriktioner. Den gældende fælles markedsordning giver imidlertid ikke Kommissionen mulighed for at reagere på en krise, der er igangsat af forbrugernes manglende tillid. Det er nøjagtig den situation vi står i i dag. Det gældende retsgrundlag skal derfor ændres, således at der skabes retsgrundlag for nye markedsstøtteforanstaltninger i sektoren. Vi foreslår derfor at udvide de eksisterende undtagelsesforanstaltninger til støtte for markedet fastlagt i artikel 14 i den fælles markedsordning til at omfatte støtteforanstaltninger i tilfælde af alvorlige forstyrrelser af markedet, der skyldes forbrugernes reaktion på trusler mod folke- eller dyresundheden. Vores forslag medfører også, at den finansielle byrde deles mellem medlemsstaterne og EU, og at foranstaltningerne kun vil blive indført efter anmodning fra medlemsstaterne. Vi tager nu det første skridt. Vi lukker hullet i lovgivningen. Når vores forslag er blevet endeligt vedtaget, skal medlemsstaterne fremlægge deres forslag til praktiske tiltag, der er tilpasset deres særlige situation. Vi mener, at denne fremgangsmåde vil give størst mulig fleksibilitet og således mest effektivt imødekomme den nuværende krise og lignende situationer fremover, hvis de skulle opstå. Der er ingen tid at spilde. Takket være Parlamentets konstruktive indstilling og den uopsættelige procedure, som Parlamentet har valgt til at behandle dette forslag, bør vi nu være i stand til at sikre en endelig vedtagelse i Rådet i løbet af de kommende uger. Dette vil være et vigtigt skridt hen imod gennemførelsen af de foranstaltninger, som fjerkræsektoren desperat anmoder om."@da2
". Herr Präsident! In den letzten Wochen und Monaten haben wir uns an die häufige Presseberichterstattung über neue Ausbrüche der Vogelgrippe gewöhnt. Der jüngste Ausbruch in einem Truthahn-Zuchtbetrieb in Sachsen wurde heute bestätigt. Wir konnten das Fortschreiten der Seuche auf Karten verfolgen und sehen, wie sie sich von einem Ort zum nächsten ausgebreitet hat. Direkt oder indirekt sind wir alle betroffen. Wir – und insbesondere der Geflügelsektor – sind mit einer wirklichen Krisensituation konfrontiert, die eine zügige Reaktion verlangt. Darum sind wir heute Abend hier. Deshalb möchte ich zuallererst dem Europäischen Parlament dafür danken, dass es der Bitte der Kommission um ein dringendes Verfahren stattgegeben hat. Besonders dankbar bin ich dem Vorsitzenden des Ausschusses für Landwirtschaft und ländliche Entwicklung, Joseph Daul, wie auch den übrigen Mitgliedern des Ausschusses für ihre schnelle Zuarbeit und Stellungnahme zum Vorschlag der Kommission. Das ist ein klarer Beleg dafür, dass wir schnell handeln können, wenn die Notwendigkeit dafür besteht. Die vielen Fälle von Vogelgrippe in der Europäischen Union sind nicht spurlos an uns vorüber gegangen. Obwohl vor allem Wildvögel der Vogelgrippe zum Opfer gefallen sind, hat es schon erhebliche negative Folgen für den europaweiten Verbrauch von Geflügel in vielen Mitgliedstaaten gegeben. Die Auswirkungen auf die Preise sind von Land zu Land unterschiedlich, aber im Allgemeinen sind die Preise unter Druck geraten und in einigen Fällen deutlich gefallen. Dadurch befindet sich der Geflügelfleischmarkt in einer außerordentlich ernsten Lage, und viele im Geflügelsektor haben ernsthafte Schwierigkeiten. Wir sind nicht untätig geblieben. Seit Beginn der Krise im letzten Herbst hat die Kommission Exporterstattungen eingesetzt, um den Markt zu stützen. Aber die Wirkung dieser Maßnahmen ist begrenzt, nicht zuletzt wegen der Einfuhrbeschränkungen für unsere Exporte in vielen Drittländern. Es ist klar, dass wir die Geflügelfleischkrise allein mit Exporterstattungen nicht bewältigen können. Die Mitgliedstaaten haben auch die Möglichkeit des Einsatzes staatlicher Beihilfen angekündigt oder entsprechende Initiativen ergriffen. Bei staatlichen Beihilfen gibt es eine breite Palette von möglichen Hilfen, wie etwa Rettungs- und Umstrukturierungsbeihilfen für Landwirte in Schwierigkeiten. Diese Bestimmungen sind dafür ausgelegt, schnell und wirksam denen im Sektor zu helfen, die wirklich bedürftig sind. Angesichts der Krise werden wir jeden Vorschlag so zügig wie möglich prüfen und dabei sowohl die Notwendigkeit, rasch zu helfen, als auch die Notwendigkeit, Wettbewerbsverzerrungen zu vermeiden, berücksichtigen. Aber wir müssen auch alternative Maßnahmen auf EU-Ebene in Erwägung ziehen. Dabei haben wir festgestellt, dass uns die bestehenden Rechtsvorschriften im Wege stehen. Unsere derzeitige GMO sieht Maßnahmen vor, die eine besondere Marktstützung in Fällen erlauben, in denen veterinärrechtliche Beschränkungen verhängt wurden. Der derzeitige Wirkungsbereich unserer GMO lässt jedoch nicht zu, dass die Kommission als Reaktion auf eine Krise handelt, die durch mangelndes Verbrauchervertrauen ausgelöst wurde. Und genau in dieser Situation befinden wir uns gegenwärtig. Deshalb muss der bestehende Rechtsrahmen geändert werden, damit wir eine rechtliche Grundlage für neue Marktstützungsmaßnahmen im Sektor haben. Darum schlagen wir nun vor, die bestehenden Sondermaßnahmen zur Marktstützung gemäß Artikel 14 der GMO auf Fälle auszudehnen, bei denen durch die Reaktion der Verbraucher infolge von Gesundheitsrisiken für Menschen und Tiere schwerwiegende Marktstörungen hervorgerufen werden. Unser Vorschlag beinhaltet auch eine Aufteilung der finanziellen Belastung zwischen den Mitgliedstaaten und dem Gemeinschaftshaushalt und würde nur auf Ersuchen der Mitgliedstaaten eingeführt werden. Wir gehen jetzt einen ersten Schritt. Wir schließen die Rechtslücke. Sobald unser Vorschlag dann angenommen ist, müssen die Mitgliedstaaten ihre Vorschläge für praktische Schritte einbringen, die ihrer spezifischen Situation entsprechen. Unserer Meinung nach ermöglicht dies größtmögliche Flexibilität und damit die wirksamste Reaktion auf die aktuelle Krise und eventuelle ähnliche Situationen in der Zukunft. Wir dürfen keine Zeit verlieren. Dank der konstruktiven Haltung des Europäischen Parlaments und des schnellen Verfahrens, das es für die Prüfung dieses Vorschlags gewählt hat, können wir jetzt durchaus sicher von einer endgültigen Annahme im Rat in den kommenden Wochen ausgehen. Das wird ein bedeutender Schritt nach vorn bei der Einleitung von Maßnahmen sein, die unser Geflügelsektor so verzweifelt fordert."@de9
"Κύριε Πρόεδρε, τις τελευταίες εβδομάδες και μήνες συνηθίσαμε τη συχνή δημοσιογραφική κάλυψη των νέων εκδηλώσεων της γρίπης των πτηνών. Η τελευταία εκδήλωση της νόσου επιβεβαιώθηκε σήμερα σε μια εκμετάλλευση γαλόπουλων στη Σαξονία. Μπορέσαμε να παρακολουθήσουμε την εξέλιξη της νόσου στους χάρτες όπως την είδαμε να εξαπλώνεται από χώρα σε χώρα. Είτε άμεσα είτε έμμεσα, μας επηρεάζει όλους. Εμείς –και συγκεκριμένα ο τομέας της πτηνοτροφίας– αντιμετωπίζουμε μια πραγματική κατάσταση κρίσης, η οποία απαιτεί ταχεία αντίδραση. Γι’ αυτό είμαστε εδώ απόψε. Θα ήθελα λοιπόν, καταρχάς, να ευχαριστήσω το Ευρωπαϊκό Κοινοβούλιο που δέχθηκε το αίτημα της Επιτροπής για κατεπείγουσα διαδικασία. Είμαι ιδιαίτερα ευγνώμων στον πρόεδρο της Επιτροπής Γεωργίας και Ανάπτυξης της Υπαίθρου, Joseph Daul, καθώς και στην υπόλοιπη επιτροπή για την ταχεία συνδρομή τους και τη γνωμοδότηση σχετικά με την πρόταση της Επιτροπής. Αυτή είναι σαφής απόδειξη ότι όταν υπάρχει ανάγκη να δράσουμε γρήγορα, μπορούμε να το κάνουμε. Τα πολλά κρούσματα γρίπης των πτηνών στην Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση δεν μας άφησαν ανεπηρέαστους. Αν και τα θύματα της γρίπης των πτηνών ήταν κυρίως άγρια πτηνά, αυτό έχει ήδη έντονη αρνητική επίπτωση στην ευρωπαϊκή κατανάλωση πουλερικών σε πολλά κράτη μέλη. Η επίπτωση στις τιμές ποικίλει από χώρα σε χώρα, αλλά γενικά οι τιμές υπέστησαν πιέσεις και σε ορισμένες περιπτώσεις σημείωσαν σημαντική πτώση. Ως αποτέλεσμα, η αγορά κρέατος πουλερικών αντιμετωπίζει μια εξαιρετικά σοβαρή κατάσταση και πολλοί στον πτηνοτροφικό τομέα αντιμετωπίζουν σοβαρές δυσκολίες. Έχουμε ήδη δράσει. Από την αρχή της κρίσης το περασμένο φθινόπωρο, η Επιτροπή χρησιμοποίησε τις επιστροφές κατά την εξαγωγή για να στηρίξει την αγορά. Αλλά η επίδραση αυτών των μέτρων ήταν περιορισμένη, ειδικά καθώς αντιμετωπίζουμε περιορισμούς εισαγωγής στις εξαγωγές μας σε πολλές τρίτες χώρες. Είναι σαφές ότι δεν μπορούμε να χειριστούμε την κρίση του κρέατος πουλερικών αποτελεσματικά μόνο με βάση τις επιστροφές κατά την εξαγωγή. Τα κράτη μέλη ανακοίνωσαν επίσης ή έλαβαν πρωτοβουλίες σχετικά με την πιθανότητα χρήσης κρατικής ενίσχυσης. Υπάρχει ένα ευρύ φάσμα δυνατοτήτων υποστήριξης μέσω κρατικής ενίσχυσης, όπως οι ενισχύσεις διάσωσης και αναδιάρθρωσης για τους αγρότες που αντιμετωπίζουν δυσκολίες. Αυτοί οι κανόνες έχουν σκοπό να παράσχουν γρήγορη, αποτελεσματική υποστήριξη σε εκείνους στον τομέα που πραγματικά την χρειάζονται. Εμείς, στο πλαίσιο της κρίσης, θα εξετάσουμε οποιαδήποτε πρόταση όσο τον δυνατόν ταχύτερα, λαμβάνοντας υπόψη τόσο την ανάγκη για άμεση βοήθεια όσο και την ανάγκη αποφυγής της στρέβλωσης του ανταγωνισμού. Ωστόσο, πρέπει επίσης να εξετάσουμε εναλλακτικά μέτρα σε επίπεδο ΕΕ. Και, ως εκ τούτου, βρεθήκαμε να αντιμετωπίζουμε εμπόδια από την ισχύουσα νομοθεσία. Η τρέχουσα ΚΟΑ μας προβλέπει μέτρα που θα επέτρεπαν την παροχή ειδικής στήριξης της αγοράς σε περιπτώσεις όπου έχουν επιβληθεί κτηνιατρικοί περιορισμοί. Το τρέχον πεδίο εφαρμογής της ΚΟΑ μας, ωστόσο, δεν επιτρέπει στην Επιτροπή να δράσει ανταποκρινόμενη σε μια κρίση που πυροδοτείται από έλλειψη εμπιστοσύνης των καταναλωτών. Και αυτή ακριβώς είναι η κατάσταση στην οποία βρισκόμαστε σήμερα. Ως εκ τούτου, το ισχύον νομικό πλαίσιο πρέπει να αλλάξει, προκειμένου να προβλέπει τη νομική βάση για νέα μέτρα στήριξης της αγοράς για τον τομέα. Προτείνουμε, συνεπώς, την επέκταση της ισχύουσας έκτακτης στήριξης της αγοράς όπως ορίζεται στο άρθρο 14 της ΚΟΑ, ώστε να περιλαμβάνει μέτρα στήριξης σε περιπτώσεις πρόκλησης σοβαρών διαταραχών στην αγορά λόγω της αντίδρασης των καταναλωτών σε κινδύνους για τη δημόσια υγεία ή για την υγεία των ζώων. Η πρότασή μας συνεπάγεται επίσης την από κοινού οικονομική επιβάρυνση των κρατών μελών και του κοινοτικού προϋπολογισμού και αυτό θα καθιερωθεί μόνο κατόπιν αιτήματος από τα κράτη μέλη. Κάνουμε τώρα το πρώτο βήμα. Συμπληρώνουμε το νομικό κενό. Μόλις εγκριθεί επιτέλους η πρότασή μας, τα κράτη μέλη θα πρέπει να υποβάλουν τις προτάσεις τους για πρακτικά μέτρα που θα αρμόζουν στην επιμέρους κατάστασή τους. Πιστεύουμε ότι αυτό θα προσφέρει τη μέγιστη δυνατή ευελιξία και, συνεπώς, την πιο αποτελεσματική απάντηση στην τρέχουσα κρίση και σε μελλοντικές παρόμοιες καταστάσεις, αν προκύψουν. Δεν υπάρχει χρόνος για χάσιμο. Χάρη στην εποικοδομητική στάση του Ευρωπαϊκού Κοινοβουλίου και στην άμεση διαδικασία μέσω της οποίας επέλεξε να εξετάσει αυτήν την πρόταση, θα μπορέσουμε τώρα να διασφαλίσουμε μια τελική έγκριση στο Συμβούλιο τις προσεχείς εβδομάδες. Αυτό θα αποτελέσει σημαντικό βήμα προς την υλοποίηση αυτών των μέτρων τα οποία ο πτηνοτροφικός κλάδος ζητά απεγνωσμένα."@el10
". Señor Presidente, en las últimas semanas y meses nos hemos acostumbrado a la frecuente aparición de artículos de prensa sobre nuevos brotes de gripe aviar. El último brote se ha confirmado hoy en una granja de pavos de Sajonia. Hemos podido seguir el desarrollo de la enfermedad en el mapa, tal y como la hemos visto extenderse de un país a otro. A todos nos afecta directa o indirectamente. Nosotros –y especialmente el sector avícola– nos enfrentamos a una verdadera situación de crisis que requiere una respuesta rápida. Por ese motivo nos encontramos aquí esta noche. Así que en primer lugar quisiera agradecer al Parlamento Europeo que haya aceptado la petición de la Comisión de un procedimiento urgente. Estoy especialmente agradecida al Presidente de la Comisión de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural, el señor Daul, y al resto de la comisión por su rápida aportación y su dictamen sobre la propuesta de la Comisión. Eso es un claro ejemplo de que cuando tenemos que actuar rápido podemos hacerlo. Los numerosos casos de gripe aviar en la Unión Europea no nos han dejado indiferentes. Aunque las víctimas de la gripe aviar han sido principalmente aves salvajes, ya ha tenido un fuerte impacto negativo sobre el consumo europeo de carne de ave en muchos Estados miembros. El impacto sobre los precios ha variado de un país a otro, pero en general los precios han estado presionados a la baja y en algunos casos han descendido de manera significativa. Debido a ello, el mercado de la carne de ave se enfrenta a una situación excepcionalmente grave y muchas personas del sector aviar se encuentran en grave dificultad. Ya hemos actuado. Desde el principio de la crisis el pasado otoño, la Comisión ha hecho uso de las restituciones a la exportación con el fin de apoyar al mercado. Pero los efectos de dichas medidas han sido limitados, sobre todo porque nos hemos enfrentado a restricciones de la importación de nuestras exportaciones en muchos países terceros. Es evidente que no podemos gestionar de manera efectiva una crisis de la carne de ave basándonos únicamente en las restituciones a las exportaciones. Los Estados miembros también han anunciado o han tomado iniciativas respecto a la posibilidad de utilizar ayudas estatales. Hay un amplio abanico de posibilidades de apoyo mediante la ayuda estatal, como el rescate y la ayuda a la reestructuración para agricultores que tienen dificultades. Esas normas están concebidas para proporcionar un apoyo rápido y eficaz a aquellas personas del sector que realmente lo necesitan. A la luz de la crisis, examinaremos cualquier propuesta lo antes posible, teniendo en cuenta tanto la necesidad de ayuda rápida y la necesidad de evitar una distorsión de la competencia. Sin embargo, también tenemos que examinar medidas alternativas en el ámbito de la UE. Y por ello nos hemos topado con obstáculos debidos a la legislación vigente. Nuestra OCM prevé medidas que permitirían un apoyo especial al mercado en casos en los que se han impuesto restricciones veterinarias. No obstante, el alcance actual de nuestra OCM no permite a la Comisión actuar en respuesta a una crisis desatada por una falta de confianza del consumidor. Y esa es precisamente la situación en la que nos encontramos hoy. Por lo tanto, es preciso modificar el marco jurídico vigente para crear el fundamento jurídico de nuevas medidas de apoyo al mercado para el sector. Por lo tanto, proponemos ampliar el actual apoyo excepcional al mercado, tal y como se estipula en el artículo 14 de la OCM, de modo que incluya las medidas de apoyo en los casos en los que la reacción de los consumidores ante riesgos para la salud pública o la salud animal ocasione graves trastornos del mercado. Nuestra propuesta también implica compartir la carga financiera entre los Estados miembros y el presupuesto comunitario y solo se introduciría a petición de los Estados miembros. Ahora damos un primer paso. Vamos a llenar el vacío legal. Una vez que nuestra propuesta se adopte finalmente, los Estados miembros tendrán que presentar sus propuestas de pasos prácticos que encajen en su situación específica. Creemos que eso permitirá la mayor flexibilidad posible y por tanto la respuesta más eficaz a la actual crisis y a situaciones similares futuras, si surgieran. No hay tiempo que perder. Gracias a la constructiva postura del Parlamento Europeo y al rápido procedimiento que ha escogido para considerar esta propuesta, ahora deberíamos ser capaces de garantizar una adopción final en el Consejo en las próximas semanas. Este será un importante paso adelante en la adopción de las medidas que nuestro sector avícola solicita tan desesperadamente."@es20
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@et5
". Arvoisa puhemies, viime viikkoina ja kuukausina olemme tottuneet siihen, että tiedotusvälineet usein kertovat uusista lintuinfluenssatapauksista. Tänään vahvistettiin viimeisin tautitapaus, joka oli todettu kalkkunatilalla Saksissa. Olemme voineet seurata kartalta taudin leviämistä maasta toiseen. Asia koskettaa meitä kaikkia joko suoraan tai välillisesti. Meitä, ja varsinkin siipikarja-alaa, on kohdannut todellinen kriisitilanne, joka edellyttää nopeita toimia. Siksi olemmekin täällä tänä iltana. Haluaisin aluksi kiittää Euroopan parlamenttia siitä, että se on hyväksynyt komission pyynnön asian käsittelemisestä kiireellisenä. Olen erityisen kiitollinen maatalouden ja maaseudun kehittämisen valiokunnan puheenjohtajalle Daulille sekä valiokunnan muille jäsenille nopeasta reagoimisesta ja kannasta komission ehdotukseen. Tämä osoittaa selvästi, että pystymme toimimaan nopeasti silloin, kun se on välttämätöntä. Euroopan unionissa todetuilla monilla lintuinfluenssatapauksilla on ollut meihin kohdistuvia vaikutuksia. Vaikka tautiin ovat menehtyneet pääasiassa luonnonvaraiset linnut, sillä on jo ollut merkittävä kielteinen vaikutus siipikarjanlihan kulutukseen monissa jäsenvaltioissa. Tilanteen vaikutus hintoihin on ollut eri maissa erilainen, mutta yleisesti on esiintynyt hintapaineita, ja joissain tilanteissa hinnat ovat laskeneet merkittävästi. Sen vuoksi siipikarjanlihamarkkinoiden tilanne on poikkeuksellisen vakava, ja monet alalla toimivista ovat huomattavissa vaikeuksissa. Olemme jo ryhtyneet toimiin. Kriisin puhjettua viime syksynä komissio on ottanut käyttöön vientitukia alan markkinoiden tukemiseksi. Noiden toimien vaikutus on kuitenkin ollut rajallinen, mikä ei johdu vähiten siitä, että moniin kolmansiin maihin suuntautuvalle viennillemme on asetettu tuontirajoituksia. On selvää, ettemme voi hoitaa siipikarjanliha-alan kriisiä tehokkaasti yksinomaan vientitukien avulla. Myös jäsenvaltiot ovat ilmoittaneet tekevänsä tai ovat jo tehneet aloitteita mahdollisuudesta käyttää valtiontukea. Valtiontuki tarjoaa useita eri tukimahdollisuuksia, kuten pelastamistuen ja rakennemuutostuen vaikeuksiin joutuneille maataloustuottajille. Noiden sääntöjen tarkoituksena on tarjota nopeata ja tehokasta tukea niille alalla toimiville, jotka ovat todella sen tarpeessa. Tässä kriisitilanteessa tarkastelemme uusia ehdotuksia mahdollisimman pikaisesti ja otamme huomioon toisaalta nopean avun tarpeen ja toisaalta sen, että on vältettävä kilpailua vääristymistä. Meidän on kuitenkin myös harkittava vaihtoehtoisia toimia EU:n tasolla. Olemmekin todenneet, että nykyinen lainsäädäntö on esteenä juuri tässä. Nykyisessä yhteisessä markkinajärjestelyssä määrätään toimista, jotka mahdollistavat erityisen markkinatuen silloin, kun on määrätty eläinten terveyteen perustuvia rajoituksia. Yhteinen markkinajärjestely ei kuitenkaan nykyisellään mahdollista komission reagoimista kriisiin, joka aiheutuu kuluttajien luottamuksen vähentymisestä. Juuri sellaisessa tilanteessa olemme tänään. Nykyistä lainsäädäntöä on siksi muutettava, jotta alan uusille markkinatukitoimille saataisiin oikeusperusta. Siksi ehdotamme, että nykyistä, yhteisen markkinajärjestelyn 14 artiklan mukaista poikkeuksellista markkinatukea laajennettaisiin tukitoimiin myös niissä tilanteissa, joissa kuluttajien reagointi kansanterveyttä tai eläinten terveyttä koskeviin riskeihin aiheuttaa vakavia markkinahäiriöitä. Ehdotuksemme käsittää myös taloudellisen rasituksen jakamisen jäsenvaltioiden ja yhteisön talousarvion kesken, ja se otettaisiin käyttöön ainoastaan jäsenvaltioiden pyynnöstä. Otamme nyt ensimmäisen askelen ja täytämme oikeudellisen aukon. Kun ehdotuksemme on viimein hyväksytty, jäsenvaltioiden on esitettävä ehdotuksensa kunkin tilanteeseen parhaiten soveltuvista käytännön toimista. Nähdäksemme näin saadaan luotua eniten joustoa, jolloin tämänhetkiseen kriisiin ja vastaisuudessa mahdollisiin samankaltaisiin tilanteisiin voidaan reagoida mahdollisimman tehokkaasti. Meillä ei ole aikaa hukattavanamme. Koska Euroopan parlamentti on suhtautunut ehdotukseemme rakentavasti ja suostunut käsittelemään sen nopeutetussa menettelyssä, saanemme hyväksyttyä asian lopullisesti neuvostossa lähiviikkoina. Tämä on tärkeä askel kohti niiden toimien toteuttamista, joita siipikarjanliha-alalla niin epätoivoisesti kaivataan."@fi7
". Monsieur le Président, la presse nous a fréquemment rapporté, ces dernières semaines et ces derniers mois, des informations faisant état de l’existence de nouveaux foyers de grippe aviaire. Le dernier en date a été confirmé aujourd’hui dans un élevage de dindes en Saxe. Nous avons été en mesure de suivre l’évolution de la maladie sur les cartes, puisque nous l’avons vue se propager d’un pays à l’autre. Nous sommes tous affectés, que ce soit directement ou indirectement. Nous sommes confrontés - le secteur aviaire en particulier - à une véritable situation de crise nécessitant une réaction rapide. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici ce soir. Je voudrais par conséquent remercier le Parlement européen d’avoir accepté la demande de procédure d’urgence présentée par la Commission. Je remercie tout particulièrement M. Daul, président de la commission de l’agriculture et du développement rural, ainsi que les autres membres de la commission, pour la célérité de leur contribution et de leur avis concernant la proposition de la Commission. Elle démontre clairement que nous sommes capables d’agir rapidement lorsque les circonstances l’exigent. Les nombreux cas de grippe aviaire signalés dans l’Union européenne n’ont pas manqué de nous affecter. Bien que la grippe aviaire ait surtout frappé des oiseaux sauvages, elle a d’ores et déjà eu un impact négatif considérable sur la consommation de volaille dans de nombreux États membres. L’effet sur les prix varie d’un pays à l’autre, mais ceux-ci se trouvent généralement sous pression et ont, dans certains cas, enregistré une baisse spectaculaire. Par conséquent, le marché de la viande de volaille fait face à une situation particulièrement grave et nombre d’opérateurs du secteur connaissent de grosses difficultés. Nous avons déjà agi. Depuis le début de la crise l’automne dernier, la Commission a fait usage des restitutions à l’exportation afin de soutenir le marché. Toutefois, l’effet de ces mesures s’avère limité, d’autant plus que de nombreux pays tiers ont restreint l’importation de nos produits. Il est évident que nous ne pouvons gérer la crise de la viande de volaille efficacement au moyen des seules restitutions à l’exportation. Les États membres ont également annoncé la possibilité d’utiliser des aides publiques ou pris des initiatives dans ce sens. Il existe un large éventail de mesures de soutien faisant appel aux aides d’État, notamment les dispositifs de sauvetage et les aides à la restructuration destinés aux agriculteurs en difficultés. Ces dispositions doivent permettre de soutenir rapidement et efficacement ceux qui, dans le secteur, se trouvent réellement dans le besoin. Nous examinerons, dans le contexte de la crise, toute proposition dans les meilleurs délais, en tenant compte du besoin d’assurer une aide rapide et d’éviter les distorsions de concurrence. Toutefois, nous devons également envisager des mesures alternatives au niveau communautaire. La législation existante limite notre champ d’action. Notre OCM actuelle comporte des mesures permettant de fournir un soutien spécial au marché lorsque des restrictions vétérinaires ont été imposées. Toutefois, le champ d’application de notre OCM actuelle ne permet pas à la Commission d’agir face à une crise engendrée par un manque de confiance du consommateur. Or, c’est exactement la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons actuellement. Il importe par conséquent de revoir le cadre juridique existant afin de créer une base juridique propice à l’application de nouvelles mesures de soutien au marché pour le secteur. Nous proposons par conséquent d’étendre l’actuel soutien exceptionnel au marché visé à l’article 14 de l’OCM en le complétant par des mesures d’assistance qui couvrent les cas dans lesquels la réaction des consommateurs face à des risques pour la santé publique ou animale provoque des perturbations graves sur le marché. Notre proposition prévoit par ailleurs la prise en charge du coût financier par les États membres et le budget communautaire. Elle ne pourrait, au demeurant, être présentée que sur demande de ceux-ci. Nous accomplissons maintenant un premier pas. Nous comblons le vide législatif. Une fois notre proposition finalement adoptée, les États membres devront soumettre des propositions d’actions concrètes conformes à leur situation particulière. Nous estimons que cette démarche permettra une liberté de manœuvre optimale et, par conséquent, constituera la réaction la plus efficace à la crise actuelle et aux situations similaires susceptibles de se produire à l’avenir. Il n’y a pas de temps à perdre. Grâce à la position constructive du Parlement européen et à la procédure rapide qu’il a choisie pour examiner cette proposition, nous devrions maintenant être en mesure d’assurer son adoption définitive au Conseil dans les semaines à venir. Ce sera un important pas en avant dans la mise en œuvre des mesures dont notre secteur aviaire a si cruellement besoin."@fr8
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@hu11
"Signor Presidente, nelle settimane e nei mesi scorsi ci siamo abituati all’assidua attenzione riservata dalla stampa ai nuovi casi di influenza aviaria. Il caso più recente è stato confermato oggi e si è verificato in un allevamento di tacchini in Sassonia. Abbiamo potuto osservare l’evolversi della malattia sulle carte geografiche, seguendo la diffusione dell’epidemia da un paese all’altro. Siamo tutti coinvolti, direttamente o indirettamente. Noi, e in particolare il settore avicolo, ci troviamo di fronte a una vera e propria crisi, che necessita di una risposta rapida. E’ per tale motivo che ci siamo riuniti qui stasera. Desidero quindi, innanzi tutto, ringraziare il Parlamento europeo per aver accolto la richiesta della Commissione di adottare la procedura d’urgenza. Rivolgo un ringraziamento particolare al presidente della commissione per l’agricoltura e lo sviluppo rurale, onorevole Joseph Daul, e agli altri membri della commissione per aver sollecitamente fornito il loro contributo e manifestato la loro opinione sulla proposta della Commissione europea. Ciò dimostra in tutta evidenza che, quando dobbiamo agire con rapidità, siamo in grado di farlo. I numerosi casi di influenza aviaria che si sono verificati nell’Unione europea non ci hanno lasciati indifferenti. Pur avendo mietuto vittime soprattutto tra uccelli selvatici, la malattia ha già avuto un forte impatto negativo sui consumi di prodotti avicoli in molti Stati membri dell’Unione europea. Gli effetti sui prezzi sono stati diversi da paese a paese, ma in linea di massima si può dire che i prezzi sono stati ovunque sotto pressione e in alcuni casi sono diminuiti in misura notevole. Di conseguenza, il mercato dei prodotti avicoli si è venuto a trovare in una situazione estremamente grave e molti operatori del settore versano in serie difficoltà. Ci siamo già dati da fare. Dall’inizio della crisi, lo scorso autunno, per sostenere il mercato la Commissione ha fatto ricorso alle restituzioni all’esportazione; gli effetti di tale misura sono stati però limitati, non da ultimo perché molti paesi terzi hanno imposto restrizioni sulle nostre esportazioni. E’ evidente che non possiamo gestire la crisi avicola in modo efficiente ricorrendo semplicemente alle restituzioni all’esportazione. Gli Stati membri hanno inoltre annunciato o adottato iniziative in merito alla possibilità di far ricorso agli aiuti di Stato. Nell’ambito di tali aiuti è possibile sfruttare una vasta gamma di misure di supporto, come gli aiuti per il salvataggio e la ristrutturazione a favore di allevatori in difficoltà. Queste norme sono state previste allo scopo di fornire un aiuto rapido ed efficace agli operatori del settore che si trovano realmente in una condizione di necessità. Alla luce della crisi, esamineremo tutte le proposte quanto più velocemente possibile, tenendo conto sia dell’esigenza di un aiuto rapido sia dell’esigenza di evitare distorsioni della concorrenza. Dobbiamo tuttavia valutare anche l’eventualità di misure alternative a livello di Unione, la cui adozione è però ostacolata dalla normativa vigente. Le attuali organizzazioni comuni di mercato prevedono misure che consentono la concessione di sostegni eccezionali al mercato solo in caso di restrizioni di tipo veterinario. Le disposizioni attuali dell’organizzazione di mercato nel settore avicolo non autorizzano invece la Commissione a intervenire a seguito di una crisi causata da mancanza di fiducia dei consumatori. E questa è esattamente la situazione in cui ci troviamo oggi. Il quadro legislativo vigente deve pertanto essere modificato in modo tale da creare la base giuridica per nuove misure di sostegno del mercato in questo settore. A questo scopo proponiamo perciò di estendere gli attuali provvedimenti eccezionali di sostegno previsti dall’art. 14 dell’organizzazione comune di mercato per includervi misure di sostegno da adottare nei casi in cui vi siano gravi disturbi del mercato causati dalla reazione dei consumatori a rischi per la salute pubblica o per la salute animale. La nostra proposta comprende anche la ripartizione dei relativi oneri finanziari tra i bilanci degli Stati membri e quello dell’Unione; tale ripartizione verrebbe introdotta solo su richiesta degli Stati membri. Ora stiamo compiendo il primo passo colmando le lacune giuridiche. Dopo che la nostra proposta sarà stata adottata, gli Stati membri dovranno a loro volta proporre gli adempimenti concreti più adatti alla loro situazione specifica. Crediamo che in tal modo sarà garantita la massima flessibilità possibile e, quindi, la risposta più efficace alla crisi attuale e a eventuali situazioni future di questo tipo. Non c’è tempo da perdere. Grazie all’atteggiamento costruttivo del Parlamento europeo e alla procedura rapida che ha deciso di applicare alla proposta in esame, dovremmo essere in grado di garantirne l’adozione definitiva da parte del Consiglio nelle prossime settimane. Questo sarà un importante passo avanti verso l’adozione delle misure che il nostro settore avicolo chiede con tanta insistenza."@it12
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@lt14
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@lv13
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@mt15
"Mijnheer de Voorzitter, in de afgelopen weken en maanden zijn we gewend geraakt aan frequente berichten in de pers over nieuwe uitbraken van vogelgriep. De laatste uitbraak, op een kalkoenfarm in Saksen, werd vandaag bevestigd. We hebben de ontwikkeling van de ziekte, die zich steeds verder uitbreidde, op de kaart kunnen volgen. Wij allen worden hier direct of indirect door getroffen. Wij – en in het bijzonder de pluimveesector – worden geconfronteerd met een echte crisissituatie, die een snelle reactie vereist. Daarom zijn we vanavond hier. Ik zou dan ook allereerst het Europees Parlement ervoor willen bedanken dat het heeft ingestemd met het verzoek van de Commissie om urgentverklaring. Ik ben met name de voorzitter van de Commissie landbouw en plattelandsontwikkeling, Joseph Daul, en de overige leden van die commissie dank verschuldigd voor hun snelle bijdrage aan en snel advies over het voorstel van de Commissie. Hier blijkt maar weer eens uit dat we wel degelijk snel kunnen handelen als dat nodig is. De talrijke gevallen van vogelgriep in de Europese Unie hebben ons niet onberoerd gelaten. Hoewel vooral wilde vogels het slachtoffer zijn geworden van de ziekte, heeft die in veel lidstaten al een zeer negatief effect gehad op de consumptie in Europa van pluimveevlees. Het prijseffect varieerde van land tot land, maar over het geheel genomen stonden de prijzen onder druk, en in sommige gevallen zijn ze scherp gedaald. Als gevolg hiervan staat de pluimveevleesmarkt voor een uitzonderlijk ernstige situatie en verkeren velen in de sector in ernstige problemen. We hebben al actie ondernomen. Sinds het begin van de crisis afgelopen najaar heeft de Commissie gebruikgemaakt van uitvoerrestituties ter ondersteuning van de markt. De effecten van die maatregelen zijn echter beperkt, niet in de laatste plaats omdat we te maken kregen met invoerbeperkingen die zijn opgelegd aan onze export naar een groot aantal derde landen. Het is duidelijk dat voor een effectieve bestrijding van de pluimveevleescrisis meer nodig is dan alleen een regeling voor uitvoerrestituties. De lidstaten hebben ook initiatieven aangekondigd of genomen op het vlak van eventuele staatssteun. Er bestaat een hele reeks ondersteuningsmogelijkheden in de vorm van staatssteun, zoals reddings- en herstructureringssteun voor boeren die in de problemen komen. Deze regels zijn zo opgezet dat snelle, doeltreffende steun kan worden verleend aan diegenen in de sector die de steun echt nodig hebben. Gezien het spoedeisende karakter van de crisis zullen we elk voorstel zo snel mogelijk behandelen, waarbij rekening zal worden gehouden met zowel de noodzaak van snelle hulp als de noodzaak om concurrentieverstoring te voorkomen. We moeten echter ook andere maatregelen op EU-niveau overwegen. En op dat punt worden we gehinderd door de bestaande wetgeving. Onze huidige GMO voorziet in maatregelen die buitengewone marktondersteuning mogelijk maken in gevallen waarin beperkingen van veterinaire aard zijn opgelegd. De huidige werkingssfeer van onze GMO staat de Commissie echter niet toe op te treden tegen een crisis die wordt aangewakkerd door een gebrek aan vertrouwen bij de consument. En dat is precies de situatie waar we ons momenteel in bevinden. Het bestaande wettelijke kader moet dan ook worden aangepast om de rechtsgrondslag te verschaffen voor nieuwe marktondersteunende maatregelen voor de sector. We stellen derhalve voor de werkingssfeer van de bestaande buitengewone maatregelen ter ondersteuning van de markt, zoals bepaald in artikel 14 van de GMO, in die zin uit te breiden dat daaronder ook worden begrepen ondersteuningsmaatregelen in gevallen waarin sprake is van ernstige marktverstoringen die worden veroorzaakt door de reactie van de consument op het bestaan van risico’s voor de volksgezondheid of voor de gezondheid van dieren. Ons voorstel behelst tevens de verdeling van de financiële lasten tussen de lidstaten en de Gemeenschapsbegroting, en zal alleen naar aanleiding van een verzoek van de lidstaten worden geactiveerd. We zetten nu een eerste stap. We vullen de juridische leemte op. Zodra ons voorstel definitief zal zijn aangenomen, zullen de lidstaten hun voorstellen moeten indienen voor de praktische stappen die aansluiten bij hun specifieke situatie. Volgens ons biedt dat de grootst mogelijke flexibiliteit en vormt het daarmee het meest efficiënte antwoord op de huidige crisis en soortgelijke situaties in de toekomst, mochten die zich voordoen. Er mag geen tijd verloren gaan. Dankzij de constructieve opstelling van het Europees Parlement en de snelle procedure waarvoor het heeft gekozen om dit voorstel te behandelen, zou de definitieve goedkeuring in de Raad de komende weken gestalte moeten kunnen krijgen. Dit zal een belangrijke stap zijn in de richting van de maatregelen waar onze pluimveesector zo wanhopig om vraagt."@nl3
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@pl16
"Senhor Presidente, nos últimos meses e semanas, temos assistido com frequência à cobertura pela imprensa de novos surtos de gripe aviária. O último surto foi hoje confirmado numa exploração de perus da Saxónia. Tivemos a possibilidade de acompanhar o desenvolvimento da doença nos mapas, à medida que a víamos alastrar de um país para o outro. Directa ou indirectamente, somos todos afectados. Estamos - e, em particular, o sector da avicultura - confrontados com uma verdadeira situação de crise, que exige uma resposta rápida. É por isso que aqui estamos hoje. Deste modo, gostaria, em primeiro lugar, de agradecer ao Parlamento Europeu o facto de ter aceite o pedido de procedimento de urgência apresentado pela Comissão. Estou especialmente grata ao Presidente da Comissão da Agricultura e do Desenvolvimento Rural, Joseph Daul, bem como aos restantes membros da comissão, pela rapidez da sua contribuição e do seu parecer sobre a proposta da Comissão. Ela atesta bem que, quando temos de actuar depressa, conseguimos fazê-lo. Os muitos casos de gripe aviária ocorridos na União Europeu não nos deixaram indiferentes. Embora tenha atingido sobretudo aves selvagens, a gripe aviária exerceu já um forte impacto negativo sobre o consumo europeu de aves em muitos Estados-Membros. O impacto sobre os preços variou de país para país, mas, de um modo geral, os preços têm estado sob pressão e, em certos casos, desceram significativamente. Em resultado disso, o mercado da carne de aves enfrenta uma situação extraordinariamente grave e muitos dos agentes do sector avícola estão a passar por sérias dificuldades. Já passámos à acção. Desde o início da crise, no último Outono, a Comissão apoiou o mercado com restituições à exportação. Mas os efeitos destas medidas revelaram-se limitados, em parte devido às restrições à importação que pesam sobre as nossas exportações num grande número de países terceiros. Assim, é óbvio que não poderemos enfrentar com eficácia esta crise no mercado da carne de aves recorrendo apenas às restituições à exportação. De igual modo, os Estados-Membros anunciaram ou lançaram iniciativas com vista à possibilidade de recorrerem à ajuda estatal. A ajuda estatal possibilita um vasto conjunto de modalidades de apoio, tais como a ajuda à recuperação e à reestruturação para avicultores em dificuldades. Estas regras destinam-se a dar um apoio rápido e eficaz aos agentes do sector que dele realmente necessitem. À luz desta crise, iremos analisar todas as propostas o mais rapidamente possível, tendo em conta a necessidade quer de prestar uma ajuda rápida quer de evitar distorções da concorrência. Contudo, temos também de equacionar medidas alternativas ao nível da UE. Nesse sentido, demos connosco manietados pela legislação existente. A nossa actual Organização Comum de Mercado prevê medidas que permitiriam um apoio especial ao mercado em caso de imposição de restrições veterinárias. Porém, o âmbito actual da nossa Organização Comum de Mercado não permite que a Comissão actue em resposta a uma crise gerada pela falta de confiança dos consumidores. E é precisamente nessa situação que nos encontramos hoje. É, pois, necessário alterar o quadro legislativo existente para criar a base jurídica de novas medidas de apoio ao mercado para o sector. Assim, propomos alargar o âmbito do apoio excepcional ao mercado existente, previsto no artigo 14.º da Organização Comum de Mercado , de modo a incluir medidas de apoio nos casos em que se verifiquem graves perturbações no mercado provocadas pela reacção dos consumidores a riscos para a saúde pública ou animal. A nossa proposta implica igualmente a repartição dos encargos financeiros entre os Estados-Membros e o orçamento comunitário e só seria accionada mediante solicitação dos Estados-Membros. Estamos a dar agora um primeiro passo, preenchendo o hiato legislativo. Logo após a adopção final da proposta, os Estados-Membros terão de apresentar as respectivas propostas, com passos concretos adequados à sua situação específica. Estamos em crer que isso permitirá maximizar a flexibilidade e, consequentemente, a eficiência da resposta à actual crise e a futuras situações semelhantes, caso estas se verifiquem. Não há tempo a perder. Graças à atitude construtiva do Parlamento Europeu e ao procedimento rápido pelo qual optou para considerar a presente proposta, deveremos estar agora em condições de garantir a sua adopção final no Conselho nas próximas semanas. Este será um passo importante para tomar as medidas de que o nosso sector avícola tão desesperadamente necessita."@pt17
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@sk18
"Mr President, in recent weeks and months we have been accustomed to frequent press coverage of new outbreaks of avian influenza. The latest outbreak was confirmed today in a turkey farm in Saxony. We have been able to follow the disease’s development on maps as we have seen it spreading from one country to another. We are all affected either directly or indirectly. We – and in particular the poultry sector – are faced with a real crisis situation, which requires a swift response. That is why we are here tonight. I would therefore, first of all, like to thank the European Parliament for having accepted the Commission’s request for urgent procedure. I am especially grateful to the Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, Joseph Daul, as well as to the rest of the committee for their rapid contribution and opinion on the Commission proposal. That is a clear testimony that when there is a need for us to act fast, we can do so. The many cases of avian influenza in the European Union have not left us unaffected. Even though mainly wild birds have been the victims of avian flu, it has already had a strong negative impact on European consumption of poultry in many Member States. The impact on prices has varied from country to country, but in general prices have been under pressure and have in some cases fallen significantly. As a result, the poultry meat market faces an exceptionally serious situation and many in the poultry sector are in severe difficulties. We have already acted. Since the beginning of the crisis last autumn, the Commission has made use of export refunds in order to support the market. But the effects of those measures have been limited, not least as we have been faced with import restrictions on our exports into many third countries. It is clear that we cannot handle the poultry meat crisis effectively on the basis of export refunds alone. Member States have also announced or taken initiatives with regard to the possibility of using state aid. There is a broad range of support possibilities via state aid, such as rescue and restructuring aid for farmers running into difficulties. Those rules are designed to give quick, effective support to those in the sector who are really in need. We will, in the light of the crisis, examine any proposal as quickly as possible, taking into account both the need for rapid help and the need to avoid distortion of competition. However, we also need to consider alternative measures at EU level. And therefore we have found ourselves hampered by the existing legislation. Our current CMO provides for measures that would allow special market support in cases where veterinary restrictions have been imposed. The current scope of our CMO, however, does not allow the Commission to act in response to a crisis that is sparked by a lack of consumer confidence. And that is exactly the situation we are in today. Therefore the existing legal framework has to be changed in order to provide the legal basis for new market support measures for the sector. We are therefore proposing to extend the existing exceptional market support as laid down in Article 14 of the CMO in order to include support measures in cases where serious market disturbances are caused by consumer reaction to public health or animal health risks. Our proposal also entails a sharing of the financial burden between Member States and the Community budget and would only be introduced upon a request from the Member States. We are now taking a first step. We are filling the legal gap. Once our proposal is finally adopted, Member States will have to submit their proposals for practical steps that will fit their specific situation. We believe that will allow the best possible flexibility, and therefore the most efficient response to the current crisis and to future similar situations, if they were to arise. There is no time to waste. Thanks to the European Parliament’s constructive stance and the rapid procedure it has chosen via which to consider this proposal, we should now be able to ensure a final adoption in the Council in the coming weeks. This will be an important step towards delivering those measures that our poultry sector is so desperately asking for."@sl19
"Herr talman! Under de senaste veckorna och månaderna har vi vant oss vid full bevakning i pressen av nya utbrott av fågelinfluensa. Det senaste utbrottet bekräftades i dag på en kalkonfarm i Sachsen. Vi har kunnat följa sjukdomens utveckling på kartan då vi sett den spridas från ett land till ett annat. Vi är alla berörda, antingen direkt eller indirekt. Vi, och särskilt fjäderfäbranschen, står inför en verklig krissituation, som kräver snabba åtgärder. Det är därför vi är här i kväll. Jag skulle därför först av allt vilja tacka Europaparlamentet för att ha accepterat kommissionens begäran om ett brådskande förfarande. Jag är särskilt tacksam mot ordföranden för utskottet för jordbruk och landsbygdens utveckling, Joseph Daul, samt resten av utskottet för deras snabba bidrag och yttrande över kommissionens förslag. Detta är ett tydligt vittnesbörd om att vi vid behov kan agera snabbt. De många fallen av fågelinfluensa i Europeiska unionen har inte lämnat oss oberörda. Även om huvudsakligen vilda fåglar har drabbats av fågelinfluensa har den redan haft ett starkt negativt inflytande på den europeiska konsumtionen av fjäderfäkött i många medlemsstater. Inverkan på priserna har varierat från en medlemsstat till en annan, men i allmänhet har priserna pressats och i en del fall sjunkit avsevärt. Resultatet av detta är att marknaden för fjäderfäkött befinner sig i en exceptionellt allvarlig situation och att många inom fjäderfäbranschen har allvarliga svårigheter. Vi har redan agerat. Sedan början på krisen förra hösten har kommissionen använt exportbidrag för att stödja marknaden. Men effekterna av de här åtgärderna har varit begränsade, inte minst eftersom vi har mött importrestriktioner på vår export till många tredjeländer. Det är tydligt att vi inte kan hantera fjäderfäköttkrisen effektivt enbart genom exportbidrag. Medlemsstater har också anmält eller tagit initiativ till eventuell användning av statligt stöd. Det finns en mängd stödmöjligheter genom statligt stöd, såsom kris- eller omstruktureringsstöd till jordbrukare som stött på svårigheter. Dessa regler är utformade för att ge ett snabbt, effektivt stöd till de aktörer i branschen som verkligen är i behov av det. Vi kommer, mot bakgrund av problemet, att granska alla förslag så snabbt som möjligt och ta hänsyn till både behovet av snabb hjälp och behovet av att undvika snedvridning av konkurrensen. Vi behöver emellertid också behandla alternativa åtgärder på EU-nivå. Och därför har vi konstaterat att vi är hindrade av den rådande lagstiftningen. Vår nuvarande gemensamma marknadsorganisation omfattar åtgärder som medger speciellt marknadsstöd då veterinära restriktioner har införts. Ramarna för vår nuvarande gemensamma marknadsorganisation medger emellertid inte att kommissionen agerar till följd av en kris som orsakats av bristande förtroende hos konsumenterna. Och det är exakt där vi befinner oss i dag. Därför måste det befintliga regelverket ändras för att tillhandahålla den rättsliga grunden för nya marknadsstödjande åtgärder för branschen. Vi föreslår därför att det rådande extraordinära marknadsstöd som fastställts i artikel 14 i förordningen om den gemensamma organisationen av marknaden utvidgas till att omfatta stödåtgärder i fall där allvarliga marknadsstörningar orsakats av konsumenternas reaktion på risker för folkhälsan eller djurs hälsa. Vårt förslag innebär också en fördelning av det ekonomiska ansvaret mellan medlemsstaterna och gemenskapsbudgeten och skulle bara införas på begäran av medlemsstaterna. Vi tar nu det första steget. Vi fyller luckan i lagstiftningen. När vårt förslag slutligen antagits kommer medlemsstaterna att bli tvungna att föreslå praktiska steg som passar deras speciella situation. Vi tror att detta kommer att medge största möjliga flexibilitet och därför vara det effektivaste svaret på den rådande krisen och på framtida liknande situationer, om sådana skulle uppstå. Det finns ingen tid att förlora. Tack vare Europaparlamentets konstruktiva inställning och det snabba förfarande som valts för behandlingen av detta förslag bör vi nu kunna garantera ett slutligt antagande av rådet under de kommande veckorna. Det här kommer att vara ett betydelsefullt steg mot att genomföra de åtgärder som fjäderfäbranschen så desperat efterfrågar."@sv21
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